Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having real trouble trying to create/use a filter in MATLAB which is accurate enough at very low frequencies.

I'm interested in a range of signals between 5 and 50Hz, the high band isn't too much of a concern, what I really want to do is filter anything beneath 5Hz. However, I'm finding the roll off with Butterworth filters is doing very little in terms of filtering, it's just attenuating the signal to about half what the normal signal is.

I've tried two methods. One was using MATLABs filter tool fdatool and the other was a manual method below:

filtLow = 5;
filtHigh = 50;
Fs = 1000;
[b, a] = butter(1, filtLow/(Fs/2), 'high');
y = filtfilt(b, a, data);

or

[b, a] = butter(1, [filtLow/(Fs/2), filtHigh/(Fs/2)]);
y = filtfilt(b, a, data);

Can anyone give me a suggestion or code which may give me better results?

share|improve this question
    
How did you design your Butterworth filter? Can you post some code? –  Eitan T Mar 7 '13 at 17:28
    
I've tried two methods. One was using MATLABs filter tool (fdatool) and the other was a manual method below: filtLow = 5; filtHigh = 50; Fs = 1000; [b, a] = butter(1, filtLow/(Fs/2), 'high'); y = filtfilt(b, a, data); OR [b, a] = butter(1, [filtLow/(Fs/2), filtHigh/(Fs/2)]); y = filtfilt(b, a, data); –  ritchie888 Mar 7 '13 at 17:48
    
In the future, please post code in the question and format it properly. –  Eitan T Mar 7 '13 at 17:51
    
Sorry, accidentally posted the comment so tried to edit it quickly. Any suggestions? –  ritchie888 Mar 7 '13 at 17:55
    
possible duplicate of High-pass filtering in MATLAB –  r.m. Mar 7 '13 at 19:05

1 Answer 1

If you want signals in the range of 5-50Hz and nothing else, the order of your filter will likely wind up being quite high. Also, a butterworth filter, although linear phase and flat frequency response in the passband does not have the best rolloff from pass band to rejection. If you can stand a little distortion, an elliptical or bessel filter would give you a much tighter rolloff. Also, if you use 5 Hz as your cutoff frequency, it should, in theory, be the -3 dB point, which is why you are seeing attenuation of 1/2. You'll need to consider some specifications.

  1. What is the lowest frequency I can accept in the passband?
  2. What is the highest frequency I can accept in the passband?

You consider this to determine desired realizable attenuation. Right now, it looks as if you want infinite attenuation at a single frequency. Unfortunately, you'll need to decide what attenuation over a frequency range is acceptable to your design.

I tried my hand at the high pass portion and came up with the following:

Fs = 1000;
BW = Fs/2;
% get the recommended order and cutoff for high pass
[n,Wc] = buttord(10/BW,5/BW,3,10);
% get the butterworth filter
[b,a] = butter(n,Wc);
% get the frequency response
[H,W] = freqz(b,a);
% plot the low end of the response
plot( BW*W(1:10)/pi, 20*log10(abs(H(1:10))) )

Gives me ->

Frequency Response

Which seems pretty reasonable.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. Lowest frequency I can accept is around 10Hz, with 5Hz being my stopband. Higher frequencies aren't of much of a worry for now, so I'm trying to focus on a high-pass filter which I can adapt to bandpass in the future. –  ritchie888 Mar 7 '13 at 18:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.