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Let's say that I have the following C++ code:

struct something
{
  // ...
  union { int size, length; };
  // ...
};

This would create two members of the struct which access the same value: size and length.

Would treating the two members as complete aliases (i.e. setting the size, then accessing the length and vice/versa) be undefined behaviour? Is there a "better" way to implement this type of behaviour, or is this an acceptable implementation?

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Why not just have one of the two? This will just cause confusion, especially because there can be a difference between size and length for certain containers. –  Overv Mar 7 '13 at 17:29
1  
It will work but it will certainly confuse anyone who's looking at code using something, but not looking at the struct definition. –  Drew Dormann Mar 7 '13 at 17:33
    
@DrewDormann - I agree. Why make things more confusing than they have to be? –  Steve Wellens Mar 7 '13 at 17:35
    
@Overv I used size and length as a simple example to demonstrate the point, but the main reason is because I was experimenting with an N-dimensional vector/point class and I wanted to be able to access values with x, y, and z while the variables are actually named something like vec<0>::val, vec<1>::val, etc. in the background. –  Undeterminant Mar 7 '13 at 17:37
1  
@AlexCharron Make x, y and z member functions that return those values. As Luchian points out, writing to one union member and reading from another is technically undefined behavior in C++. But I'd be very surprised to find any C++ compiler that behaved unexpectedly when you do that. –  Praetorian Mar 7 '13 at 17:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, this is allowed and well-defined. According to §3.10 [basic.lval]:

10/ If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through a glvalue of other than one of the following types the behavior is undefined:

— the dynamic type of the object

[...]

Since here we store an int and read through an int, we access the object through a glvalue of the same dynamic type than the object, thus things are fine.


There even is a special caveat in the Standard for structures that share the same prefix. Or, in standardese, standard-layout types that share a common initial sequence.

§9.2/18 If a standard-layout union contains two or more standard-layout structs that share a common initial sequence, and if the standard-layout union object currently contains one of these standard-layout structs, it is permitted to inspect the common initial part of any of them. Two standard-layout structs share a common initial sequence if corresponding members have layout-compatible types and either neither member is a bit-field or both are bit-fields with the same width for a sequence of one or more initial members.

That is:

struct A { unsigned size; char type; };
struct B { unsigned length; unsigned capacity; };

union { A a; B b; } x;

assert(x.a.size == x.b.length);

EDIT: Given that int is not a struct (nor a class) I am afraid it's actually not formally defined (I certainly could not see anything in the Standard), but should be safe in practice... I've brought the matters to the isocpp forums; you might have found a hole.

EDIT: Following the above mentionned discussion, I have been shown §3.10/10.

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does a scalar type count as a "standard-layout struct"? –  Stephen Lin Mar 7 '13 at 17:48
    
@StephenLin: Not sure (not struct), they are certainly standard-layout types and they are layout-compatible though. –  Matthieu M. Mar 7 '13 at 17:55
    
OK, your example in the answer is clearly defined but the example in his question might not be (strictly, it might be a defect in the standard), the exception only seems to apply if you access through members of "standard layout structs" which is not the case if they're naked, unless there's some special language that says a scalar type is equivalent to its corresponding single-member struct –  Stephen Lin Mar 7 '13 at 17:58
    
@StephenLin: I think there is a guarantee on the representation of standard-layout struct containing a single member; but I agree I would prefer a more explicit statement regarding "naked" types. It seems obvious given §9.2/19; but explicit trumps "obvious". –  Matthieu M. Mar 7 '13 at 18:01
    
I agree, if you put two and two together there doesn't seem to be any way for an implementation to satisfy the requirements and not have this behavior, short of manually interfering with lookup on purpose, but it would be better if there were an explicit guarantee (it seems like an oversight) –  Stephen Lin Mar 7 '13 at 18:02

It is not undefined behavior. Both of the aliases in the union will be accessing the same location in the memory. See below:

§9.2/18 If a standard-layout union contains two or more standard-layout structs that share a common initial sequence, and if the standard-layout union object currently contains one of these standard-layout structs, it is permitted to inspect the common initial part of any of them. Two standard-layout structs share a common initial sequence if corresponding members have layout-compatible types and either neither member is a bit-field or both are bit-fields with the same width for a sequence of one or more initial members.

It is undefined if types have different initial sequence.

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1  
It is undefined behavior - see stackoverflow.com/questions/11373203/… –  Luchian Grigore Mar 7 '13 at 17:34
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But that states that it's undefined because it's a byte-to-byte copy, which I believe is still valid if it's from the same type to the next. This is a sort of grey area, which is why I asked. –  Undeterminant Mar 7 '13 at 17:40
1  
it's a bit odd that if you put both size and length inside of a struct (but both still in the union, separately), it might actually be defined...but having them naked seems not to be –  Stephen Lin Mar 7 '13 at 17:43
1  
It is defined behavior. It is undefined if types have different initial sequence. –  meyumer Mar 7 '13 at 17:43
1  
@meyumer at least according to the quotes on that page, that only applies to "standard-layout structs", unless there's another standard quote that address this for scalar types (do you have one?) –  Stephen Lin Mar 7 '13 at 17:45

Values will be same. If you assign 5 to size then length will also be 5.

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