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A project I'm working on uses multiple threads to do work on a collection of files. Each thread can add files to the list of files to be processed, so I put together (what I thought was) a thread-safe queue. Relevant portions follow:

// qMutex is a std::mutex intended to guard the queue
// populatedNotifier is a std::condition_variable intended to
//                   notify waiting threads of a new item in the queue

void FileQueue::enqueue(std::string&& filename)
{
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(qMutex);
    q.push(std::move(filename));

    // Notify anyone waiting for additional files that more have arrived
    populatedNotifier.notify_one();
}

std::string FileQueue::dequeue(const std::chrono::milliseconds& timeout)
{
    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(qMutex);
    if (q.empty()) {
        if (populatedNotifier.wait_for(lock, timeout) == std::cv_status::no_timeout) {
            std::string ret = q.front();
            q.pop();
            return ret;
        }
        else {
            return std::string();
        }
    }
    else {
        std::string ret = q.front();
        q.pop();
        return ret;
    }
}

However, I am occasionally segfaulting inside the if (...wait_for(lock, timeout) == std::cv_status::no_timeout) { } block, and inspection in gdb indicates that the segfaults are occurring because the queue is empty. How is this possible? It was my understanding that wait_for only returns cv_status::no_timeout when it has been notified, and this should only happen after FileQueue::enqueue has just pushed a new item to the queue.

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1  
Here you go: justsoftwaresolutions.co.uk/threading/… – GManNickG Mar 7 '13 at 18:04
    
Question, why are you taking filename by ref-ref? I can't see any reason for that here> – Tony The Lion Mar 7 '13 at 18:20
    
@TonyTheLion Generally in C++ it is more efficient to pass objects by reference than to make a copy. In this case I'm also using move semantics, which lets the compiler move the contents of the string into the queue instead of making another copy. – Matt Kline Mar 7 '13 at 20:24
    
@slavik262: Your use of std::forward here isn't normal (that used in "universal references"), you should just std::move it. – GManNickG Mar 7 '13 at 21:22
    
@GManNickG Sorry, could you elaborate? – Matt Kline Mar 8 '13 at 0:31
up vote 17 down vote accepted

According to the standard condition_variables are allowed to wakeup spuriously, even if the event hasn't occured. In case of a spurious wakeup it will return cv_status::no_timeout (since it woke up instead of timing out), even though it hasn't been notified. The correct solution for this is of course to check if the wakeup was actually legit before proceding.

The details are specified in the standard §30.5.1 [thread.condition.condvar]:

—The function will unblock when signaled by a call to notify_one(), a call to notify_all(), expiration of the absolute timeout (30.2.4) specified by abs_time, or spuriously.

...

Returns: cv_status::timeout if the absolute timeout (30.2.4) specifiedby abs_time expired, other-ise cv_status::no_timeout.

share|improve this answer
    
And how would you suggest doing that? Just by checking if the queue is empty again? – Matt Kline Mar 7 '13 at 18:03
3  
Addendum: I could likely protect against spurious wakeups using a predicate such as the one here. – Matt Kline Mar 7 '13 at 18:05
    
Yes. It's called a condition variable because it is associated with some condition, which you must check is actually true. In your case the condition to check is !q.empty() – Jonathan Wakely Mar 7 '13 at 19:55
1  
If you use a lambda as the optional argument to the wait() call, it will do the check for you and prevent the spurious wakeup from having any effect. – derpface Jan 19 '15 at 14:19

Just looking at it, when you check a condition variable it is best to use a while loop (so that if it get wakes up and is still not invalid you check again). I just wrote a template for an async queue, hope this helps.

#ifndef SAFE_QUEUE
#define SAFE_QUEUE

#include <queue>
#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>

template <class T>
class SafeQueue
{
public:
  SafeQueue(void)
    : q()
    , m()
    , c()
  {}

  ~SafeQueue(void)
  {}

  void enqueue(T t)
  {
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(m);
    q.push(t);
    c.notify_one();
  }

  T dequeue(void)
  {
    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(m);
    while(q.empty())
    {
      c.wait(lock);
    }
    T val = q.front();
    q.pop();
    return val;
  }

private:
  std::queue<T> q;
  mutable std::mutex m;
  std::condition_variable c;
};
#endif
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks! Thankfully I've already solved the issue using predicates as described here. – Matt Kline Apr 22 '13 at 2:38
    
Simplest and most elegant solution of the lot, IMHO. – kuroi neko Sep 13 '14 at 0:48
    
Great solution! Thanks for sharing. One question though. How do you deal with the situation where the queue is full? Do we need to consider it while designing a queue? – Sarah Jun 28 '15 at 22:58
    
Sorry for the late response, I wouldn't worry about it, but I haven't been working in C++ in a long time and the systems I am on are not really memory constrained. – ChewOnThis_Trident Jul 28 '15 at 20:27

This is probably how you should do it:

void push(std::string&& filename)
{
    {
        std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(qMutex);

        q.push(std::move(filename));
    }

    populatedNotifier.notify_one();
}

bool try_pop(std::string& filename, std::chrono::milliseconds timeout)
{
    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(qMutex);

    if(!populatedNotifier.wait_for(lock, timeout, [this] { return !q.empty(); }))
        return false;

    filename = std::move(q.front());
    q.pop();

    return true;    
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I ended up doing something similar. – Matt Kline Mar 7 '13 at 18:13
    
Two comments on that otherwise fine code: 1) before notify_one, I would unlock the mutex for reasons found on en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/thread/condition_variable/notify_one 2) the wait process can be awoken spuriously, so I would additionally introduce a bool variable indicating that push is indeed over – IceFire Oct 30 '14 at 10:11
1  
1) Minor optimization. 2) This overload of wair_for handles spurious wakes through the second argument. – ronag Oct 30 '14 at 11:35
    
Sorry, you are right. Actually, 1) is accomlished via lock_guard already. My error in reasoning for 2) was that I thought a push operation could be ongoing if the queue was not empty... however, in this case the still-blocked mutex would keep wait_for waiting anyways. Thanks! – IceFire Oct 30 '14 at 13:30

Adding to the accepted answer, I would say that implementing a correct multi producers / multi consumers queue is difficult (easier since C++11, though)

I would suggest you to try the (very good) lock free boost library, the "queue" structure will do what you want, with wait-free/lock-free guarantees and without the need for a C++11 compiler.

I am adding this answer now because the lock-free library is quite new to boost (since 1.53 I believe)

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Thanks for pointing out that library. There currently doesn't seem to be documentation for the queue, however. Any idea on where that can be found? – Matt Kline May 21 '14 at 13:31

I would rewrite your dequeue function as:

std::string FileQueue::dequeue(const std::chrono::milliseconds& timeout)
{
    std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(qMutex);
    while(q.empty()) {
        if (populatedNotifier.wait_for(lock, timeout) == std::cv_status::timeout ) 
           return std::string();
    }
    std::string ret = q.front();
    q.pop();
    return ret;
}

It is shorter and does not have duplicate code like your did. Only issue it may wait longer that timeout. To prevent that you would need to remember start time before loop, check for timeout and adjust wait time accordingly. Or specify absolute time on wait condition.

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I some time ago I came across the same problem and then write a GNU thread-safe-asynchronous-queue template in C++11. I posted in my blog:

http://gnodebian.blogspot.com.es/2013/07/a-thread-safe-asynchronous-queue-in-c11.html

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There is also GLib solution for this case, I did not try it yet, but I believe it is a good solution. https://developer.gnome.org/glib/2.36/glib-Asynchronous-Queues.html#g-async-queue-new

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