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I have a block of data like this:

RW |  PK   A    B    C    D
============================
1  |  1    aa   123  x    99
2  |  2    aa   234  v    98
3  |  3    bb   321  z    11
4  |  4    bb   210  w    91
5  |  5    cc   456  y    55 

How can I grab just the first item of each set (ID'd by column A), like so?

RW |  A    B    C    D
=======================
1  |  aa   123  x    99
2  |  bb   321  z    11
3  |  cc   456  y    55 

I can GROUP BY or use DISTINCT but that's very inefficient with what I'm looking at, while running a straight list takes less than 100msecs. The two aforementioned options also may produce more than once instance of an item in column A, since the related values may differ.

In other words,

SELECT MYTABLE.A, MYTABLE.D, MYTABLE.D, MYTABLE.D 
FROM MYTABLE 

is very fast (less than a second), while

SELECT MYTABLE.A, MYTABLE.D, MYTABLE.D, MYTABLE.D 
FROM MYTABLE
GROUP BY MYTABLE.A, MYTABLE.D, MYTABLE.D, MYTABLE.D

and

SELECT DISTINCT MYTABLE.A, MYTABLE.D, MYTABLE.D, MYTABLE.D 
FROM MYTABLE 

takes a much longer amount of time (minutes, but I have not let it complete).

I need no aggregate functions (COUNT, SUM, etc.), just a listing, once per item. The number of occurrences per value in column A vary, so I can't just grab every x row.

Why don't I just run the list and use Excel or something like that to sort? I'm looking at a few million records to be returned, and I am not able to process so many records using any software that I am familiar with.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It sounds like you want something like

SELECT pk,
       a,
       b,
       c,
       d
  FROM( SELECT pk,
               a,
               b,
               c,
               d,
               row_number() over (partition by a order by pk asc) rnk
          FROM your_table )
 WHERE rnk = 1
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like it will return the right results, but this still takes a significant amount of time to run. I may be asking for too much, but is there any faster method? –  Gaffi Mar 7 '13 at 18:28
    
@Gaffi - What does "a significant amount of time" mean? Presumably, Oracle is going to have to do a full table scan of the table (or a full scan of a covering index depending on the columns you select) and there will be some sorting. If the query is going to return millions of rows, that implies the table has tens of millions of rows so a table scan isn't likely to be instantaneous. On the other hand, if the table is a few GB in size, it shouldn't take hours for the query to run unless you've got serious I/O issues. –  Justin Cave Mar 7 '13 at 18:32
    
I mean 'significant' in that the direct pull of all records is less than a second, but the grouping/sorting takes minutes. I am running the query now, and I don't know how long it will take overall, but I will update again when it's done. –  Gaffi Mar 7 '13 at 18:35
    
@Gaffi - Are you sure that it takes a second to return all million rows? That seems unlikely particularly if you are running this on a machine other than the database server. Most GUIs will display the first N rows that are returned relatively quickly while the database is still processing the query. When you introduce a sort, however, Oracle often can't return the first row until it has read the last row from the table because it can't be sure that the last row isn't going to change the sort order. You need to compare the time required to retrieve the last row not the first row. –  Justin Cave Mar 7 '13 at 18:38
    
It took about 9 minutes, so that's not wholly unreasonable. If I have to live with the wait, that is ok, I would just rather have as small as possible. –  Gaffi Mar 7 '13 at 18:42

Try this too..

select * from table where rowid in (select min(rowid) from table group by a);
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try this is not a proper answer. Post a comment instead. –  Narendra Pathai Mar 8 '13 at 5:45

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