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I'm building an MVC 4 website and I'm trying to follow the repository pattern.

I've seen a complex setup like below but I'm unable to follow it through due to my skill level:

public interface IEntityRepository<T>
    where T : class, IEntity, new()
{
    void CommitChanges();
    void DeleteOnCommit(T entity);
    T GetEntity(int key);
    IQueryable<T> GetAll();
    int InsertOnCommit(T entity);
}

I've opted for this approach instead due to the simplicity:

public class EntityAdminRepository : IAdminRepository {

    AdminEntities db = new AdminEntities();

    public Models.Product CreateNewProduct(Models.Product productToCreate) {
       db.Products.Add(productToCreate);
       return productToCreate;
    }

    public void DeleteProduct(int id) {
        db.Products.Remove(GetProductByID(id));
    }

    public Models.Product GetProductByID(int id) {
        return db.Products.FirstOrDefault(d => d.ID == id);
    }

    public IEnumerable<Models.Product> GetAllProducts() {
        return db.Products;
    }

    public Models.Category CreateNewCategory(Models.Category categoryToCreate) {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void DeleteCategory(int id) {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public Models.Category GetCategoryByID(int id) {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public IEnumerable<Models.Category> GetAllCategories() {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public int SaveChanges() {
       return db.SaveChanges();
    }
}

Apart from the issues with up-scaling (which I think would lie elsewhere then anyway) is this solution so horrific I should dump it right now and work at it until I can understand and implement the initial example?

Update 1: My problem with using first approach is I don't know how to recreate the following functionality ending up at this point in a controller:

    protected IAdminRepository _repository;

    public AdminController() : this(new EntityAdminRepository()) { }
    public AdminController(IAdminRepository repository) {
        _repository = repository;
    }

And this way means I have an entity for each DTO how does this all culminate together?

Update 2:

public class DatabaseRepository<T> : IRepository<T> 
    : where T:class, IEntity, new() 
{
    private DbContext context = new MyDbContext(); // proper data actions
    public T GetEntity(int id) 
    {
        return context.Tables<T>.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Id == id);
    }
}

public class InMemoryRepository<T> : IRepository<T> 
    : where T:class, IEntity, new() 
{
    private List<T> context = new List<T>(); // stuff for unit testing
    public T GetEntity(int id) 
    {
        return context.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Id == id);
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
For what it's worth, I'd advise you to take the time to gain a deep understanding of the first example (Generic Repository). You're going to see it over and over again. –  Forty-Two Mar 7 '13 at 19:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here are some pros and cons to your approach:

PRO

  • Simple
  • Easy to understand
  • Explicit
  • Does what you need
  • Straight-forward to test

CON

  • Unwieldy with larger numbers of model types
  • Lots of repetitive code
  • Doesn't take advantage of things like inheritance or generics
  • Adding new functionality is inherently risky since changes need to be made to every repos individually

That being said, the generic repos will tend to suit your needs better overall. Here's how it works:

First, the interface. This is important because it defines a commonly agreed-upon contract by which any class implementing it is guaranteed to follow.

The <T> means that the interface is being declared as a generic type. Generic types are sweet because you can essentially 'template' out your code and avoiding repeating yourself (DRY!). The T is a placeholder parameter for which an actual type name will take the place of when it is actually used in code.

where T : class, IEntity, new() is a bit of a doozer if you're not familiar with it. Generic types, like this interface, sometimes need to be constrained - often you need to guarantee that any T is a reference type for instance. Everything after the : constitute just such a constraint set. class means that any value for T must be a class, not a value type. IEntity means that any class for T has to implement the IEntity contract. new() is the least intuitive and means that T must have a default, parameterless constructor. That one's important because oftentimes you want to be able to simply call var a = new T().

Here's an example

public interface IEntity { public int Id { get; set;} }

public class FooEntity : IEntity { public int Id { get; set; } }

public class Repository<T> : IRepository<T> 
    : where T:class, IEntity, new() 
{
    private DbContext context = new MyDbContext(); // or however your db store works

    public Repository(IDbContext ctx) { context = ctx; }

    public T GetEntity(int id) 
    {
        return context.Tables<T>.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Id == id);
    }
}

Notice how I'm still using that <T> stuff? That's the special sauce. It means that I can use my ProductRepository like this:

var a = new Repository<Product>();
var foo = a.GetByKey(1234); //foo is Product

now, to work with and modify objects using the repo, you have a straight-forward path:

1) Get the object(s) you want to change from the repos 2) Make the changes to the object(s) 3) Tell the repos to write the changes to the datastore

In code,

var a = new Repository<Product>(/* optionally, a mocked context object */);
var foo = a.GetByKey(1234); //foo is Product
// modify
foo.Name = "Bleach";
a.CommitChanges();
// create
var bar = new Product();
bar.Name = "Paper Towels";
a.InsertOnSubmit(bar);
a.CommitChanges();

Here's an MVC example, assuming the controller example in your updated post:

// ctor not listed here

public ActionResult AddProduct(Product product)
{
    if (Model.IsValid) // validate the model - may not be exact syntax...
    {
        _repository.InsertOnSubmit(product);
        _repository.CommitChanges();

        return View(product);
    }
    else { //do something else }
}
share|improve this answer
    
more forthcoming, didn't want to lose it if I need to close the window –  Josh E Mar 7 '13 at 19:25
    
Thanks a lot Josh, my main issue is the usage. I don't know how to recreate what Update 1 shows using this approach. –  Smithy Mar 7 '13 at 19:32
1  
see my update - tried to pare it down a bit and provide usage example –  Josh E Mar 7 '13 at 19:44
2  
You have less code with this method, not more. –  qujck Mar 7 '13 at 19:52
1  
no problem glad to help -- yes, your update 2 would make unit testing controller actions for instance very easy. Just new() your controller class and pass in an instance of your in-memory IRepos and you're good to go. –  Josh E Mar 7 '13 at 20:08

You will technically have one repository for every model, regardless. Each repository deals with one model, and will have to be instantiated for each model. However, your first example uses what's called "generics". It's a fancy and very powerful feature of C# and other .NET family languages that allows you to tell the compiler essentially, "I'll tell you what type I'm dealing with here later, just assume I'm going to feed you a valid type". So, with a generic repository, you'll have just one class, but you'll instantiate it multiple times throughout your code with a different model type passed in:

var catRepository = new Repository<Cat>();
var dogRepository = new Repository<Dog>();

Instead of having to define a CatRepository and a DogRepository and so on, ad infinitum.

share|improve this answer
    
I get that bit but it's the point in between that's the problem. Create() { somethingIDontKnow.catRepo.InsertOnSubmit(new Cat()); } –  Smithy Mar 7 '13 at 19:40

In my experience, however hard you try and however long you spend on it, when you get to the end of a project and will always know how you would've done it [if you could start again]. There's plenty of improvements you could make to your design but you need to take a pragmatic stance. What are you able to do right now?

I would suggest start with what you have with a view to restarting it again a few times as you go ...


A generic interface is extremely flexible. I recommend this article. Save it and read it many times ;-)

.NET Junkie - query/command

share|improve this answer
    
I do agree the trouble is now I've asked the question the answer seems closer and I want to avoid rewriting at least one of those times if I can. This is actually the third time I've rewritten the 2nd rev just takes too long to ship out. –  Smithy Mar 7 '13 at 19:43
1  
I see your point. As the understanding comes you'll find you can turn the same code around faster and faster each time you need to. It's a walk before you run situation. Always Enjoy! :-) –  qujck Mar 7 '13 at 19:51

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