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When I create a class and override ToString(), and when I run Visual Studio under Debugger I can hover over the variable of the type with a mouse cursor and VS shows me whatever I return in the method, letting to put there sum of information typical for this particular class and valuable during debugging. However if I inherit my class from List, VS always shows something like Count=20 ignoring value returned from my overridden ToString(), so I have to type variable.ToString() in QuickWatch window every time I want to see the class summary. Is there any way to make VS show ToString() for class inherited from List?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You'll need to create your own sub-class that inherits the .NET List class, and override the ToString() method there. Anywhere you use the standard List<type> syntax would need to be changed to use your new custom List class.

public class MyList<T> : List<T>
{
    public override string ToString()
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (T t in this)
        {
            sb.Append("[" + t.ToString() + "] ");
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }
}

using this code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    MyList<string> strings = new MyList<string>();
    strings.Add("asdf");
    strings.Add("teare");
}

generates this output when ToString() is called:

[asdf] [teare]

edit for your question:

i'd recommend building a common interface, and you can specify a particular template to match that version of whatever your list class is, that could then fetch specific custom class members. the code below demonstrates.

public interface IWidget
{
    string Name { get; }
}

public class Widget : IWidget
{
    public string Name { get; private set; }
    public Widget(string name_) { Name = name_; }
}

[DebuggerDisplay("{this.ToString()}")]
public class MyList<T> : List<T> where T : IWidget
{
    public override string ToString()
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (IWidget w in this)
        {
            sb.Append("[" + w.Name + "] ");
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }
}

Note: this will limit the types that you can use in your custom collection class, but that might not matter depending on what you're trying to achieve.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but I need to operate by this specific type's properties inside ToString(), so this method should be aware of type. MyList<T>: List<T>, and then MySpecifiTypeList: MyList<MySpecificType> does not help me, same Count = 20 as result –  YMC Mar 7 '13 at 20:02
    
updated with more code to show you how you could do that. –  Mike Corcoran Mar 7 '13 at 21:54
    
Mike, did you run it to check results? I copy&pasted your code, but keep getting Count=2. Please advise –  YMC Mar 7 '13 at 22:18
    
yes, I tested all of this code in a test project before putting any of it up. post your working example in a SSCCE and I can see what's up. –  Mike Corcoran Mar 8 '13 at 15:45
    
I'm using exactly the same code you provided, copied it and pasted as is, and get the same Count=2. Note I'm talking about hovering mouse over strings variable, it does not run ToString() in my case –  YMC Mar 8 '13 at 16:28

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