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I recently had a discussion with another developer who was using <table> for data that was not tabular.

<table><tr><td> Server: </td><td> Development </td></tr></table>

I pointed out that tabular data has more than one dimension, and use of tables for styling/presentation is discouraged. He responded that just because the table was one row does not mean that the data is non-tabular.

It seems to me that if "tabular data" has more than one dimension it would require at least two rows and two columns. However, he pointed out that <table><tr><td></td></tr></table> (as well as <table></table>) both validate, and that if he is using <table> incorrectly, the W3C is unclear and they did a poor job with their validator.

I think that <table> is supposed to be used to represent data that is tabular whether or not the resulting structure is tabular as their can be caveats. In the above example, there will only ever be one server, but you can potentially have zero or more rows of multi-column data that is perhaps filtered on a date range.

My question is who is right here? If I am misunderstanding the spec, then how am I misunderstanding? If you have data that is tabular but not enough filtered data to print out multiple rows (i.e. if it is filtered on a small date range) is it incorrect to print only the column headers? Should you print a "no results found" full colspan row as well? If data in <table> must be multi-dimensional, why does a single-column and/or single-row table validate?

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closed as not constructive by MarcinJuraszek, Jukka K. Korpela, zzzzBov, 宮本 武蔵, Audrius Meškauskas Mar 7 '13 at 20:42

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Validity of markup has absolutely nothing to do with semantics. <p> by itself is valid HTML, even though empty paragraphs make no sense in writing. –  BoltClock Mar 7 '13 at 19:25
    
It seems to me that if "tabular data" has more than one dimension it would require at least two rows and two columns. what about a data set that happens to have only 1 row, though?.... Interesting question; I think I remember a previous similar one, hold on –  Pekka 웃 Mar 7 '13 at 19:25
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Remotely related Proper definition for "tabular data" in HTML –  Pekka 웃 Mar 7 '13 at 19:30
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@Ark: If I was going to close this I would have done so much earlier. –  BoltClock Mar 7 '13 at 19:38
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@BoltClock - The spec also has a table processing model which <table><tr></tr></table> falls foul of. However, I cant' think of any situation where a tr with zero td and th elements wouldn't fall foul of the processing model, so I don't know why the tr content model allows it either. –  Alohci Mar 7 '13 at 20:50
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I agree with the others, validity of markup is not equivalent to semantics of the markup.

Tabular data should have a column headers to describe the data it holds. So the most minimal table would be, (1 column with 1 row of data, that column should have a heading):

<table>
    <thead>
        <tr>
            <th>My Heading</th>
        </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td>my value</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

If you want to represent "no results found" it should be displayed outside of the table. Because no results foundis not data. No results should display nothing in the table, or better yet, hide the table and display your no results found message.

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In before "use the <caption> element"... (no, please for the love of everything don't use <caption> to say no results found) –  BoltClock Mar 7 '13 at 20:14
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It seems to me that if "tabular data" has more than one dimension it would require at least two rows and two columns. However, he pointed out that <table><tr><td></td></tr></table> (as well as <table></table>) both validate, and that if he is using <table> incorrectly, the W3C is unclear and they did a poor job with their validator.

Validity of markup has absolutely nothing to do with semantics. <p> by itself is valid HTML, even though empty paragraphs make no sense in writing. In the same way, the following three tables are all valid, even though they contain no actual data:

<table></table>

<table>
  <tbody>
</table>

<table>
  <thead><tr><th>
  <tbody>
  <tfoot><tr><th>
</table>

As you have observed, though, a <tr> element with no children is invalid:

<table>
  <tr>
</table>

It's not clear to me why that is the case, as I cannot find any rules in the current HTML 5.0 CR that state that a <tr> element must have at least one child which is either a <td> or a <th> element (it simply says it may contain zero or more of either kind).

Anyway, if a table contains only one row, so be it; that simply means there's only one record to be listed in the table. But tabular data semantics is not a question of whether this table has only one row, but whether this structure is suited for any number of data records expressed in a two-dimensional format. That's what constitutes tabular data.

In your example, will there potentially be more than one entry for "Server" (which, incidentally, if it were a real table heading it should be a <th> rather than a <td> and it should not contain a colon)? If not, and all you want to do is to tell the user which server they're on for instance, then a table is not the most appropriate element to use to present this information. You should possibly use a heading or a label, and some other textual container for the value "Development".

If you have data that is tabular but not enough filtered data to print out multiple rows (i.e. if it is filtered on a small date range) is it incorrect to print only the column headers? Should you print a "no results found" full colspan row as well?

Whether you choose to display a row that says "no results found" is up to you; either way should be acceptable. In this case, all you have is a table that is designed to contain tabular data but for some reason does not have any data to present.

If data in <table> must be multi-dimensional, why does a single-column and/or single-row table validate?

Because even a 1x1 square (i.e. 1²) grid is still considered two-dimensional, even if this single cell is a <th> with no accompanying rows (again, validity and semantics are two very distinct matters).

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Well I think you could at least make the argument that the data is tabular (the guy I was talking to did after all), and as Madara Uchiha said you could potentially add other rows, but since we don't have a solid definition it's hard to pin down. I guess what's most important about semantics is your intended meaning, and he definitely did not intend for this to be tabular data. –  Explosion Pills Mar 7 '13 at 20:09
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@Explosion Pills: Yes, exactly. –  BoltClock Mar 7 '13 at 20:13
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Valid != Semantic, let's start with that. I can make my entire webpage with <div>s alone, does that make it semantic? No.

Tabular data doesn't necesarily mean that it has more than one dimension (although that sure helps!). Tabular data means "Table which makes the most sense to be put in a table". It does need to be data though, placing navigation links within a table is by definition unsemantic.

It depends on exactly what he placed inside that table. It might be that a table is fine, try to give an example of what he actually put there.

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The first code block is an example. Basically it's telling you what server you have selected for the page you are looking at –  Explosion Pills Mar 7 '13 at 19:29
    
@ExplosionPills: Oh, I missed that. Yes, that type of data is fine for a table (mainly because you can easily expand it to include other data elements, and thus have more rows). Basically, it's a special case of a table where only one data element exist (like a one element array in programming languages). –  Second Rikudo Mar 7 '13 at 19:31
    
That table can never have more than one row though (you can only be using one server on the page at a time). Any other rows would have unrelated data –  Explosion Pills Mar 7 '13 at 19:36
    
@ExplosionPills: What about Status: Online or Language: PHP? He can easily include any other relevant data. And this is data. –  Second Rikudo Mar 7 '13 at 19:38
    
I would think that that kind of data would be more suited to a definition list or the like (key-value pairs) –  Explosion Pills Mar 7 '13 at 19:43
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My problem with tables - and I work with developers that only really know how to use them - is that I cannot move content in a table tag around quite as easily as data in a div tag. Sure, you can make a table into pretty much anything, and move it around almost as easily as a div tag, but there's more overhead (more tags) involved in the table itself.

You end up needing to spend more time adjusting padding, spacing, and the like. It's overall far less efficient to work with tables than with DIV's, as well as requiring more code / less visually easy to read code. I like my table tags in nice neat individual lines like the code example another answerer provided; otherwise you run the risk of weird nesting. You have far less nesting issues with DIV use.

That said, many people find DIV's confusing and don't know how to deal with the more flexible tag.

So it's a personal preference issue, really. The more CSS you know and are willing to learn the more likely you are to use DIV's. The simpler the site and the more developers who don't know CSS you want to be able to work with, the easier it is to use tables. You just limit your viability when it comes to reformatting your page drastically without touching the HTML code. (or back-end server code that generates the HTML code)

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You're completely skirting the point of the question, which is semantics, not presentation/layout. –  BoltClock Mar 7 '13 at 19:41
    
I definitely agree with you; I prefer not to use <table> purely for styling if for no other reason because it's hard to update –  Explosion Pills Mar 7 '13 at 19:44
    
I'm a pragmatist. I don't care about the semantics of who's right and who's wrong; the important question to me is which code is more flexible and maintainable, and the balance between those two variables. –  Dylan B Mar 7 '13 at 19:44
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