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I'm looking for some way to effectively hide inherited members. I have a library of classes which inherit from common base classes. Some of the more recent descendant classes inherit dependency properties which have become vestigial and can be a little confusing when using IntelliSense or using the classes in a visual designer.

These classes are all controls that are written to be compiled for either WPF or Silverlight 2.0. I know about ICustomTypeDescriptor and ICustomPropertyProvider, but I'm pretty certain those can't be used in Silverlight.

It's not as much a functional issue as a usability issue. What should I do?

Update

Some of the properties that I would really like to hide come from ancestors that are not my own and because of a specific tool I'm designing for, I can't do member hiding with the new operator. (I know, it's ridiculous)

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7 Answers 7

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Override them like Michael Suggests above and to prevent folks from using the overridden (sp?) methods, mark them as obsolete:

[Obsolete("These are not supported in this class.", true)]
public override  void dontcallmeanymore()
{
}

If the second parm is set to true, a compiler error will be generated if anyone tries to call that method and the string in the first parm is the message. If parm2 is false only a compiler warning will be generated.

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While you cannot prevent usage of those inherited members to my knowledge, you should be able to hide them from IntelliSense using the EditorBrowsableAttribute:

Using System.ComponentModel;

[EditorBrowsable(EditorBrowsableState.Never)]
private string MyHiddenString = "Muahahahahahahahaha";

Edit: Just saw this in the documentation comments, which makes it kinda useless for this purpose:

There is a prominent note that states that this attribute "does not suppress members from a class in the same assembly". That is true but not complete. Actually, the attribute does not suppress members from a class in the same solution.

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One potential thing you can do is contain the object rather than extend from the other class. This will give you the most flexibility in terms of exposing what you want to expose, but if you absolutely need the object to be of that type it is not the ideal solution (however you could expose the object from a getter).

Thus:

public class MyClass : BaseClass
{
// Your stuff here
}

Becomes:

public class MyClass
{
private BaseClass baseClass;

public void ExposeThisMethod()
{
baseClass.ExposeThisMethod();
}
}

Or:

public class MyClass
{
private BaseClass baseClass;

public BaseClass BaseClass
{
get
{
return baseClass;
}
}
}
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I think you're best least hackish way is to consider composition as opposed to inheritance.

Or, you could create an interface that has the members you want, have your derived class implement that interface, and program against the interface.

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To fully hide and mark not to use, including intellisense which I believe is what most readers expect ...

[Obsolete("Not applicable in this class.")] 
[DesignerSerializationVisibility(DesignerSerializationVisibility.Hidden)]
[Browsable(false), EditorBrowsable(EditorBrowsableState.Never)]
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I know there's been several answers to this, and it's quite old now, but the simplest method to do this is just declare them as new private.

Consider an example I am currently working on, where I have an API that makes available every method in a 3rd party DLL. I have to take their methods, but I want to use a .Net property, instead of a "getThisValue" and "setThisValue" method. So, I build a second class, inherit the first, make a property that uses the get and set methods, and then override the original get and set methods as private. They're still available to anyone wanting to build something different on them, but if they just want to use the engine I'm building, then they'll be able to use properties instead of methods.

Using the double class method gets rid of any restrictions on being unable to use the new declaration to hide the members. You simply can't use override if the members are marked as virtual.

public class APIClass
{
    private static const string DllName = "external.dll";

    [DllImport(DllName)]
    public extern unsafe uint external_setSomething(int x, uint y);

    [DllImport(DllName)]
    public extern unsafe uint external_getSomething(int x, uint* y);

    public enum valueEnum
    {
        On = 0x01000000;
        Off = 0x00000000;
        OnWithOptions = 0x01010000;
        OffWithOptions = 0x00010000;
    }
}

public class APIUsageClass : APIClass
{
    public int Identifier;
    private APIClass m_internalInstance = new APIClass();

    public valueEnum Something
    {
        get
        {
            unsafe
            {
                valueEnum y;
                fixed (valueEnum* yPtr = &y)
                {
                    m_internalInstance.external_getSomething(Identifier, yPtr);
                }
                return y;
            }
        }
        set
        {
            m_internalInstance.external_setSomething(Identifier, value);
        }
    }

    new private uint external_setSomething(int x, float y) { return 0; }
    new private unsafe uint external_getSomething(int x, float* y) { return 0; }
}

Now valueEnum is available to both classes, but only the property is visible in the APIUsageClass class. The APIClass class is still available for people who want to extend the original API or use it in a different way, and the APIUsageClass is available for those who want something more simple.

Ultimately, what I'll be doing is making the APIClass internal, and only expose my inherited class.

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I tested all of the proposed solutions and they do not really hide new members.

But this one DOES:

[DesignerSerializationVisibility(DesignerSerializationVisibility.Hidden)]
public new string MyHiddenProperty
{ 
    get { return _myHiddenProperty; }
}

But in code-behide it's still accessible, so add as well Obsolete Attribute

[Obsolete("This property is not supported in this class", true)]
[DesignerSerializationVisibility(DesignerSerializationVisibility.Hidden)]
public new string MyHiddenProperty
{ 
    get { return _myHiddenProperty; }
}
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