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So I'm getting a crash of a debug application in visual studio 10 using the multi-threaded debug runtime DLL. I've done a fair share of googling, and the only thing I could find were some references to applications linking to an external library using a different runtime library version (which I don't believe is the case here).

The last bit of code I get to see is the definition of _Lockit::_Lockit(3), which calls _Mtxlock(&mtx[3]);, where mtx is an array of critical sections. How do I debug an error of this sort, which I believe only occurs intermittently? Note the string being destructed in this case is a temporary returned from a function, so there's no possibility it's being destructed or even referenced elsewhere.

ntdll.dll!76fbb42b()    
ntdll.dll!76fbb3ce()    
ntdll.dll!76f70133()    
msvcp100d.dll!std::_Lockit::_Lockit(int kind)  Line 64 + 0x14 bytes C++
msvcp100d.dll!std::_Container_base12::_Orphan_all()  Line 200   C++
MyExe.exe!std::_String_val<wchar_t,std::allocator<wchar_t> >::~_String_val<wchar_t,std::allocator<wchar_t> >()  Line 478 + 0xb bytes    C++
MyExe.exe!std::basic_string<wchar_t,std::char_traits<wchar_t>,std::allocator<wchar_t> >::~basic_string<wchar_t,std::char_traits<wchar_t>,std::allocator<wchar_t> >()  Line 754 + 0xf bytes  C++

Edit: Per request, the code that caused the problem is as follows (using pugixml library, with modifications)

xml_document xmlMessage;    
xml_node pRoot = xmlMessage.append_child(L"event");
pRoot.append_child(L"id", to_wstr(id).c_str());
Instance().SendMessage(xmlMessage.to_wstr());

with xmlMessage.to_wstr() being implemented as:

PUGI__FN std::wstring xml_node::to_wstr() const
{
    xml_writer_string wsr;
    this->print(wsr, L"", format_raw, encoding_wchar);
    return wsr.mResult;
}

and xml_writer_string being implemented as:

class PUGIXML_CLASS xml_writer_string : public xml_writer
{
public:
    // Construct writer from an output stream object
    virtual void write(const void* data, size_t size);
    std::wstring mResult;
};

PUGI__FN void xml_writer_string::write(const void* data, size_t size)
{
    mResult += std::wstring(static_cast<const wchar_t*>(data), size / sizeof(wchar_t));
}
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I assume you got a runtime exception? If so, what was the error code? –  Roger Rowland Mar 7 '13 at 19:49
    
Had to restart, will catch it next time I can - it was 'access violation reading 0xcccccd' or something like that though. –  Rollie Mar 7 '13 at 20:21
    
Most likely the problem in your code. You're looking for the problem in the wrong place. It might be helpful if you posted the code that causes access violation. –  Grigoriy Chudnov Mar 7 '13 at 21:07
    
Edited; you may be right if I misunderstood how pugixml works, but I don't see why an issue would arise in a wstring destructor. –  Rollie Mar 7 '13 at 21:12

1 Answer 1

The clue here is the 'access violation reading 0xcccccd' error. That address corresponds to the pattern used to in debug builds for uninitialised variables. The fact that it's trying to read memory at that address suggests that you may have an uninitialised pointer which you're then dereferencing. When you hit this error, walk up the stack in the debugger, checking all the variables in the Locals view. Set the display mode to hexadecimal and then it should be easier to see -- you then need to look out for variables with values of 0xCC, 0xCCCC and 0xCCCCCCCC, depending on the variable's length. If you see any then these are uninitialised variables and this is most likely the cause of your crash.

See also: How to end up with a pointer to 0xCCCCCCCC

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Interesting to know - I will give it a shot, but I don't see how I could be receiving this sort of error at the location that I am seeing it. –  Rollie Mar 7 '13 at 21:47
    
The key bit may well be much further up the stack. Also check whether it's CCCCCCCC or CDCDCDCD, which would indicate a different error, as that pattern is used for uninitialised memory allocated on the heap, rather than the stack. A useful table of values is here: nobugs.org/developer/win32/debug_crt_heap.html –  the_mandrill Mar 7 '13 at 21:53
    
These exceptions can sometimes occur if you mix DLL's and EXE's built with Debug and Release. Are all your modules built against the Debug runtime? –  Roger Rowland Mar 8 '13 at 5:48

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