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I have to write a program that reads single char values from a .txt file into an array. When I run the code it displays a bunch of weird symbols.

enter image description here

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
const int NUM_ANS = 10;
char answers[NUM_ANS], student[NUM_ANS];


ifstream correctAnswers;
correctAnswers.open("C:\\Users\\RCLRC115\\Desktop\\student.txt");
int count = 0;
while (count < NUM_ANS && correctAnswers >> answers[count])
    count++;

for (int i = 0; i < NUM_ANS; i++) {
    cout << answers[i] << endl;
}

cin.get();
return 0;
}
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Probably not the bug, but your second loop should have the condition i < count. –  molbdnilo Mar 7 '13 at 20:28
    
No because it's not a nested loop, by the end of the loop count and NUM_ANS both hold 10 as their value, and I prefer to use NUM_ANS because it will be a constant through out my program. –  Manuel Medina Mar 7 '13 at 20:32
    
If the file can't be found, or contains garbage, or less than 10 characters (you did mean to just read 10 characters, not 10 lines?) then your code will print garbage characters. Changing the second loop to use count means you'll only print what you read in. –  Roddy Mar 7 '13 at 20:36
    
no, I meant to read 10 lines... how would I go about so it reads 10 lines instead? –  Manuel Medina Mar 7 '13 at 20:45
    
You meant to read 10 lines? Can you show us the contents of student.txt please? –  Nik Bougalis Mar 7 '13 at 21:59
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3 Answers

You re opening the file incorrectly.

It should be

correctAnswers.open("C:\\Users\\RCLRC115\\Desktop\\student.txt");

You have to escape \ character

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Or better yet just use forward slashes –  David Brown Mar 7 '13 at 19:50
    
+1. Bless C++11 and its raw strings –  StoryTeller Mar 7 '13 at 19:51
    
I scaped all \\ characters now but it still shows random symbols –  Manuel Medina Mar 7 '13 at 19:57
    
Try calling correctAnswers.is_open() to see if the file was opened and displaying the value count before the loop (and looping up to count instead of NUM_ANS). –  Nik Bougalis Mar 7 '13 at 20:01
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Something tells me that correctAnswers.open fails because the path you use is wrong. Remember that in C and C++ you must escape the \ character by typing it as \\ when inside a string.

There is an important lesson here: always check that operations succeed. ifstream::is_open exists and returns a value for a reason. :)

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I used if (correctAnswers.is_open()) and it shows it's not opening the files, I just don't understand why. I even tried changing the path of student.txt to be inside the project folder and that way I dont have to write all the path but it still not opening the file :/ –  Manuel Medina Mar 7 '13 at 20:15
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I recommend using comments, and some form of error catching. Even if it just displays a message that there was an error, and what that error was. Try this it worked for me:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    const int NUM_ANS = 10;
    char answers[NUM_ANS], student[NUM_ANS];

    // would recommend: 'ifstream fin;' because its shorter
    ifstream correctAnswers;

    // open the txt file
    // ifstream.open(const char* Filename, std::ios_base::open_mode _Mode);
    // use 'ios_base::in' for input, and 'ios_base::out' for output
    // it tells the ifstream how to file should be opened. In this case for input.
    correctAnswers.open("C:/Users/RCLRC115/Desktop/student.txt", ios_base::in);

    // check that the last ifstream operation didn't fail.
    if (correctAnswers.fail())
    {
        // print error message
        cout << "ERROR: Could not open file!";
        cin.get();

        // Return a value other than 0 so you'll know there was an error by looking
        // at the output window
        // The program '[#] programName.exe: Native' has exited with code 1
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        // print success message
        cout << "SUCCESS: File Opened! Reading File..." << '\n';
    }

    int count = 0;

    // 'while (count < NUM_ANS && correctAnswers << answers[count])' is where one error was
    // 'while (count < NUM_ANS)' is correct. correctAnswers << answers[count] is telling it to store
    // the read characters in answers[count], not checking if the character was read, and valid.

    // Basically saying:
    // 'while (count < NUM_ANS)' AND 'while (ifstream.good())' 
    // meaning the input file stream read a character and not the end of file.
    while (count < NUM_ANS && correctAnswers.good())
    {
        // this is where the other error was, it probably wasn't storing anything in answers[count]
        // store the values read in answers[count]
        correctAnswers >> answers[count];
        // increment count so loop will end
        count++;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < NUM_ANS; i++) 
    {
        // print the value in the command window
        cout << answers[i] << endl;
    }

    // Make sure to close files open with ifstream, ofstream, and iofstream
    correctAnswers.close();

    // Wait to get input so window doesn't close
    cin.get();

    // Return 0, program exited normally
    return 0;
}
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