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I am trying to create a very simple evolution algorithm for a creature simulator, what I would like to have is, both creatures have a trait and a dominance level, both noted by ints. their child's trait will be a random number between creature A's trait and creature B's trait then skewed to the more dominant. So if A has a trait of 5 and dominance of 2 and B has a trait of 10 and a dominance of 7 their child is more likely to have a trait of 8 than 6. Is there a good way to do this?

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SO is not a place for such questions. Read FAQ. –  freakish Mar 7 '13 at 20:16
    
Why? What am I missing? –  EasilyBaffled Mar 7 '13 at 20:33
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You haven't broken the problem down sufficiently. I can see at least two questions here, first how to affect probabilities by dominance factors and second how to generate a random number with weighted probabilities. The second part has been asked many times before, e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/6430578/… –  Mark Ransom Mar 7 '13 at 20:38
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@EasilyBaffled I think Programmers would be better suited for your question, in particular "algorithm and data structure concepts". StackOverflow would be more appropriate if say, you had python code that you could show for, and were trying to figure out why a certain line wasn't returning a proper value. This question is more abstract than that. –  cwgem Mar 7 '13 at 20:38
    
@EasilyBaffled some people just complain if they don't know a good answer. best to ignore them. –  andrew cooke Mar 7 '13 at 22:38
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1 Answer

you probably don't want exactly what you described, because the population will converge too rapidly. that's because you asked for children that are always between the parent values. so extreme values will quickly die out.

more likely, what you want is a number with a fixed amount of noise, but centred around a value calculated as you described. and that is quite easy to do - the centre is just a weighted average.

so, for example, say the traits are T1 and T2, and the dominance values are D1 and D2. the central value for the trait of the child would be TC:

TC = (D1 * T1 + D2 * T2) / (D1 + D2)

then you would add some noise, equally positive or negative to that, and finally convert to an integer.

[an aside, just to show the above makes sense: you can see that if the dominances are equal, D1=D2 then then above becomes

TC = (T1 + T2) / 2

which is the average, as you would expect. and if D1 is much bigger than D2 then

TC ~ T1

which is also as expected since then 1 is dominating 2.]

in python:

from random import uniform

delta = 2 # the amount of noise

def child(t1, d1, t2, d2):
    tc = float(d1 * t1 + d2 * t2) / float(d1 + d2)
    tc += uniform(-delta, delta)
    return int(0.5 + tc) # convert to int unbiased

and if i run that a few times with the numbers you used as an example:

>>> child(5, 2, 10, 7)
7
>>> child(5, 2, 10, 7)
11
>>> child(5, 2, 10, 7)
8
>>> child(5, 2, 10, 7)
9

which looks about right. note that the value is not forced to be between the parent values - in one case it is 11 - but it is centred around somewhere near 8, as expected.

finally, you might reduce delta slowly as the population stabilises (a kind of simulated annealing).

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