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I have several counters that keep increasing (never decreasing) by concurrent threads. Each thread is responsible of one counter. Occasionally, one of the threads would need to find the minimum of all counters. I do this with a simple iteration over all counters and select the minimum. I need to ensure that this minimum is no greater than any of the counters. Currently, I don't use any concurrency mechanisms. Is there any chance that I get a wrong answer (i.e., end up with a minimum that is greater than one of the counters). The code works most of the time, but occasionally (less than 0.1% of the time), it breaks by finding a minimum that is larger than one of the counters. I use a C++ code, and the code looks like this.

unsigned long int counters[NUM_COUNTERS];
void* WorkerThread(void* arg) {
  int i_counter = *((int*) arg);
  // DO some work
  counters[i_counter]++;
  occasionally {
    unsigned long int min = counters[i_counter];
    for (int i = 0; i < NUM_COUNTERS; i++) {
      if (counters[i] < min)
        min = counters[i];
    }
    // The minimum is now stored in min
  }
}

Update: After employing the fix suggested by @JerryCoffin, the code looks like this

unsigned long int counters[NUM_COUNTERS];
void* WorkerThread(void* arg) {
  int i_counter = *((int*) arg);
  // DO some work
  counters[i_counter]++;
  occasionally {
    unsigned long int min = counters[i_counter];
    for (int i = 0; i < NUM_COUNTERS; i++) {
      unsigned long int counter_i = counters[i];
      if (counter_i < min)
        min = counter_i;
    }
    // The minimum is now stored in min
  }
}
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1  
"Is there any chance that I get a wrong answer" Yes. "I don't use any concurrency mechanisms" That's why. –  Drew Dormann Mar 7 '13 at 20:04
    
Following @JerryCoffin solution, the code is fixed as below for (int i = 0; i < NUM_COUNTERS; i++) { unsigned long int counter_i = counters[i]; if (counter_i < min) min = counter_i; } –  aseldawy Mar 7 '13 at 20:58
    
Side comment on: "but occasionally (less than 0.1% of the time)": For something to fail 0.1% time, it has to be tested at least 1000 times :-) I presume we have a automated testing, recording, and comparison mechanism here. –  Arun Mar 7 '13 at 21:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, it's broken -- it has a race condition.

In other words, when you pick out the smallest value, it's undoubtedly smaller than any other you look at -- but if the other thread increments it after you do the comparison, it could end up larger than some other counter by the time you try to use it.

 if (counters[i] < min)
        // could change between the comparison above and the assignment below
        min = counters[i];

The relatively short interval between comparing and saving the value explains why the answer you're getting is right most of the time -- it'll only go wrong if there's a context switch immediately after the comparison, and the other thread increments that counter often enough before control switches back that it's no longer the smallest counter by the time it gets saved.

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1  
to fix you should only have to take a copy of the counters before doing the comparison. –  Keith Nicholas Mar 7 '13 at 20:14
    
@KeithNicholas: It depends on what you want -- that'll give you the result that was correct when you started looking, but may be wrong by the time you finish (but it's still definitely a valid approach). –  Jerry Coffin Mar 7 '13 at 20:15
2  
yeah, but min is going to be potentially wrong any moment after you assign min anyways –  Keith Nicholas Mar 7 '13 at 20:16
    
Thanks. I believe this is the problem I have. @JerryCoffin, you mean that the answer will be out-dated. This is not a problem as far as the result I get is no greater than any of the counters. –  aseldawy Mar 7 '13 at 20:21
    
@user818100 There's also a race on the variable itself, it needs to either be atomic or protected with a lock. –  GManNickG Mar 7 '13 at 20:23

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