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I have recently been learning common lisp and though I am not a programmer by training have really been enjoying it. I have noticed that I want to write my R code differently because of it. For example this code as a re-working of code in Verzani Simple R online book:

with(list(p=0.5, m=50, n=20, alpha=0.1),
 with(list(phat=rbinom(m,n,p)/n, zstar=1-alpha/2),
      with(list(SE=sqrt((1-phat)*phat/n)),{
        matplot(rbind(phat-SE*zstar,phat+SE*zstar),
                rbind(1:m,1:m), type='l',
                lty=1)
        abline(v=p)})))

Is this a reasonable and reasonably idiomatic way to write in R or just a case of shoe horning an approach from another language? I personally like that I can bind variables once and then not have to use assignments and the general look and feel.

The code in the Verzani book is as follows for comparison (made changes suggested by Dason):

  local({
  m=50;
  n=20;
  p=.5;
  phat=rbinom(m,n,p)/n
  SE = sqrt(phat*(1-phat)/n)
  alpha = 0.10;zstar= qnorm(1-alpha/2)
  matplot(rbind(phat-zstar*SE,phat+zstar*SE), rbind(1:m,1:m),type="l",lty=1)
  abline(v=p)})

EDIT: As pointed out by Spacedman this is more terse than my version which would be greatly improved if R had something like LET* in lisp. If anyone, knows a way I can achieve that succinctly please comment.

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closed as not constructive by Andrie, joran, Justin, Ananda Mahto, Josh O'Brien Mar 7 '13 at 20:42

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1  
If you like it, then keep doing it. I find it difficult to read. But then, that's just my opinion. Since this question asks for opinion on style, rather than a specific programming question, I am voting to close as not constructive. –  Andrie Mar 7 '13 at 20:10
    
@andrie I agree that one can write ones own code in any style one wants, but I am more interested whether it would be considered idiomatic enough for more permanent code such as in in an open source project. –  mcheema Mar 7 '13 at 20:19
3  
Rewrite your example in a more R-ish way and compare for readability and debuggery. –  Spacedman Mar 7 '13 at 20:20
1  
Nested with functions seem likely to break down at some point. You are already warned in help(with) not to use it within functions. You may want to look at Reference Classes if you need environments where constants can be stored. –  BondedDust Mar 7 '13 at 23:35
    
Thanks @dwin I had not noticed that warning. Hadn't looked at reference classes too closely but now I think I will. –  mcheema Mar 7 '13 at 23:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are saying that:

with(list(p=0.5, m=50, n=20, alpha=0.1),
 with(list(phat=rbinom(m,n,p)/n, zstar=1-alpha/2),
      with(list(SE=sqrt((1-phat)*phat/n)),{
        matplot(rbind(phat-SE*zstar,phat+SE*zstar),
                rbind(1:m,1:m), type='l',
                lty=1)
        abline(v=p)})))

is worth doing over:

local({
  p=0.5;m=50;n=20;alpha=0.1
  phat=rbinom(m,n,p)/n
  zstar=1-alpha/2
  SE=sqrt((1-phat)*phat/n)
  matplot(rbind(phat-SE*zstar,phat+SE*zstar),rbind(1:m,1:m), type='l',lty=1)
  abline(v=p)
})

I rest my case.

share|improve this answer
    
The Verzani original is definitely terser but the first version is not adding symbols to the namespace and so is doing more in that sense and it allows one to separate initialization from assignment. Hopefully, to avoid assignments as much as possible if trying to follow a more functional style. –  mcheema Mar 7 '13 at 20:32
3  
To be fair those aren't quite equivalent since the first doesn't actually pollute the global environment. You would need to wrap a call to local or something similar to make them more equivalent –  Dason Mar 7 '13 at 20:32

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