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I am using SBT 0.12.0. I have read other answers on stackoverflow and followed them, however none of them helps, for example:

  • create ForkRun class - I have not observed any forked process during my usage of sbt
  • set environment variable JAVA_OPS - it is set but sbt's process command line does not seem to use it at all.
  • sbt -J-Xmx2G appends the parameter to sbt process command line, however the old value -Xmx1536m is used by sbt instead of the appended parameter.

Am I missing something? How do I set heap size for sbt 0.12, when doing both testing and run?

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6  
Have you tried mem parameter when you starting sbt? (e.g. sbt -mem2000) – om-nom-nom Mar 7 '13 at 20:23
1  
You might have a typo, it should be JAVA_OPTS not JAVA_OPS – Noah Mar 7 '13 at 20:57
    
Check out my answer to a duplicate of this question. stackoverflow.com/questions/3868863/… the marked answer there is wrong, but mine works (sometimes you need to check comments/votes too :) – iwein Oct 9 '13 at 8:17

You need SBT_OPTS, here's what I use in my .bash_profile:

export SBT_OPTS="-Xmx1536M -XX:+UseConcMarkSweepGC -XX:+CMSClassUnloadingEnabled -XX:MaxPermSize=2G -Xss2M  -Duser.timezone=GMT"

UPDATE: To get your 2G heap space you can use this:

export SBT_OPTS="-Xmx2G -XX:+UseConcMarkSweepGC -XX:+CMSClassUnloadingEnabled -XX:MaxPermSize=2G -Xss2M  -Duser.timezone=GMT"
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1  
Thank you. It indeed changes sbt process command line as expected, however the old -Xmx1546m still exists in the command line and max heap size is still capped at 1.5 GB, as shown in visualvm. – user972946 Mar 7 '13 at 21:56
2  
Yeah, you need to use -Xmx2G, I updated the SBT_OPTS – Noah Mar 7 '13 at 22:02
    
any way to set this environment setting in the SBT config that's source-controlled? – Kevin Meredith Jan 16 '15 at 14:40
    
Take a look at scalaz source, they have a bash file called sbt that loads everything they need aka is environment specific github.com/scalaz/scalaz/blob/series/7.2.x/sbt – Noah Jan 16 '15 at 15:00
    
I get a warning: Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM warning: ignoring option MaxPermSize=4G; support was removed in 8.0 – samthebest Mar 4 '15 at 17:29

As of March 2015, if you are using sbt on OSX with Homebrew then you should edit the file /usr/local/etc/sbtopts

e.g.

# set memory options
#
#-mem   <integer>
-mem 2048
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2  
This seems to also work well for windows, instead of having to mess around with env variables (the file is under c:\program files\sbt\confs). – Luciano Sep 24 '15 at 11:27

"sbt -mem 23000 run" works for me.

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1  
thats 23Gb isn't it..? – Ben Hutchison Feb 23 at 0:29
up vote 11 down vote accepted

I have found the solution. No matter how you specify JVM heap size, it will never work because SBT executable already has it overridden.

There is a line in SBT executable which says:

. /usr/share/sbt/sbt-launch-lib.bash

So I edited the file:

  # run sbt
  execRunner "$java_cmd" \
    ${SBT_OPTS:-$default_sbt_opts} \
-   $(get_mem_opts $sbt_mem) \
    ${java_opts} \
    ${java_args[@]} \
    -jar "$sbt_jar" \
    "${sbt_commands[@]}" \
    "${residual_args[@]}"

Remove the - line.

Now when you run SBT, it will no longer override your JVM heap size settings. You can specify heap size settings using @Noan's answer.

Or alternatively:

sbt -J-Xmx4G -J-Xms4G

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2  
Actually it seems that export SBT_OPTS="..." in ~/.sbtconfig does work indeed. – Erik Allik Mar 13 '14 at 21:36

I was looking to solve a problem like this on Mac OS X with a homebrew install of SBT. If you installed SBT via homebrew, you're in the clear since the /usr/local/bin/sbt file looks like

#!/bin/sh
test -f ~/.sbtconfig && . ~/.sbtconfig
exec java -Xmx512M ${SBT_OPTS} -jar /usr/local/Cellar/sbt/0.12.3/libexec/sbt-launch.jar "$@"

This means that any settings you put in SBT_OPTS will stick (your -Xmx will take precedence). Furthermore, the first line of the script will execute any commands in ~/.sbtconfig if it exists so it may be a better place to put your SBT options if you are playing with them quite a bit. You won't have to source ~/.bash_profile every time you make a change to SBT_OPTS

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have you verified this works? – Erik Allik Mar 13 '14 at 19:15
1  
yes. This is what I have in $HOME/.sbtconfig. export SBT_OPTS="-XX:MaxPermSize=512M -Xmx2G -Xms64M" and when i start sbt, I do a ps aux and it displays /usr/bin/java -Xmx512M -XX:MaxPermSize=512M -Xmx2G -Xms64M -jar /usr/local/Cellar/sbt/0.13.0/libexec/sbt-launch.jar – Adrian Rodriguez Mar 20 '14 at 1:26
    
However, I just saw the answer below and perhaps that launcher is for another type of setup. My setup is specific to Mac using the homebrew package. – Adrian Rodriguez Mar 20 '14 at 1:31
1  
Homebrew SBT now requires the heap size to be configured with -mem parameter in /usr/local/etc/sbtopts – Synesso Mar 16 '15 at 0:43

On windows, for sbt 0.13.9.2, you need to set JAVA_OPTS to the jvm options you want.

> set JAVA_OPTS=-Xmx1G
> sbt assembly

The sbt.bat script loads its defaults from conf\sbtconfig.txt into CFG_OPTS but will use JAVA_OPTS instead if set.

Relevant excerpts from sbt.bat:

rem FIRST we load the config file of extra options.
set FN=%SBT_HOME%\..\conf\sbtconfig.txt
set CFG_OPTS=
FOR /F "tokens=* eol=# usebackq delims=" %%i IN ("%FN%") DO (
  set DO_NOT_REUSE_ME=%%i
  rem ZOMG (Part #2) WE use !! here to delay the expansion of
  rem CFG_OPTS, otherwise it remains "" for this loop.
  set CFG_OPTS=!CFG_OPTS! !DO_NOT_REUSE_ME!
)

. . . (skip) . . .

rem We use the value of the JAVA_OPTS environment variable if defined, rather than the config.
set _JAVA_OPTS=%JAVA_OPTS%
if "%_JAVA_OPTS%"=="" set _JAVA_OPTS=%CFG_OPTS%
:run
"%_JAVACMD%" %_JAVA_OPTS% %SBT_OPTS% -cp "%SBT_HOME%sbt-launch.jar" xsbt.boot.Boot %*
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