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While looking for material to learn Rx, I found this: Reactive Extensions (Rx) Koans. From the intro:

Definition of ‘Koan’
Kōans is a zen word meaning the enlightenment or awakening of a person, usually through a puzzle or riddle. The most common one is “What is the sound of one hand clapping?”

It is composed of many short test cases that teach different aspects of Rx.

One of them should intuitively pass, however, it fails. Can you explain why ?

Here it is, in full:

    [TestMethod]
    [Timeout(___)] //"Fill in the blanks" - I tried several values, e.g. 4000. No changes.
    public void AsynchronousRunInParallel()
    {
        Func<int, int> inc = (int x) =>
                                {
                                    // I set a breakpoint here and it's never hit.

                                    Thread.Sleep(1500);
                                    return x + 1;
                                };
        double result = 0;
        var incAsync = Observable.FromAsyncPattern<int, int>(inc.BeginInvoke,
                                                             inc.EndInvoke);
        incAsync(1).Merge(incAsync(9)).Sum()
                               .SubscribeOn(Scheduler.Immediate)
                               .Subscribe(n => result = n);

        Assert.AreEqual(12, result);
                    //the failing message says: 'expected 12, got 0'
    }
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1  
Did you add the thread sleep? If so, that's the cause - you're checking the result before the actual operations have had time to finish. – JerKimball Mar 7 '13 at 20:21
    
The only thing I edited was the "fill in the blanks" part. – Cristi Diaconescu Mar 7 '13 at 20:29
    
The way I understand it: Merge "spills" the results from two "pipes" (two IObservable's) into a single pipe, as they come; Sum subscribes to an IObservable and consumes all its elements (and sums them), then returns a new IObservable with a single element (the sum) which is then consumed by Subscribe( n=> ...) . The Scheduler part is a black box for me, for now. – Cristi Diaconescu Mar 7 '13 at 20:33
    
I tried removing the Thread.Sleep() and indeed, the test passes. But I still don't understand why. What I expected from this test (looking at the "fill in the blanks" part) was to see that long operations are parallelized (e.g. set the time limit for the test to 2 seconds (enough for two runs of inc in parallel, but not enough if they run serially), and see it pass). – Cristi Diaconescu Mar 7 '13 at 20:37
    
Which VS/testrunner are you using? – nemesv Mar 7 '13 at 20:48
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Short answer:

you're not allowing enough time for the asynchronous portion of the test to execute before checking the results.

Longer answer:

The sequence of actions this test performs is a bit like:

  • Set up an IObservable that will asynchronously invoke a delegate
  • Chain that into another IObservable that is the merged results of two of those asynchronous calls, summed together
  • Subscribe to the resulting IObservable, causing two async invocations of the method
  • Doh! there is a Thread.Sleep in the delegate, so the asynchronous invocation is blocked!
  • Immediately check the result, which of course will be 0 - the two blocked async calls haven't "finished"

There are a number of ways you can "fix" this:

  • remove the Thread.Sleep
  • Change the call to be synchronous by changing BeginInvoke, although this would require a whole restructuring of the test
  • Use a HistoricalScheduler instead of the Immediate one

Using a HistoricalScheduler is HIGHLY recommended while trying to unit test Rx stuff - basically, it lets you jump forward and backward in virtual time, a key feature for testing time-dependent code like Rx queries:

var theTardis = new HistoricalScheduler();

Func<int, int> inc = (int x) =>
{
    theTardis.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1500));
    return x + 1;
};
double result = 0;
var incAsync = Observable.FromAsyncPattern<int, int>(inc.BeginInvoke,inc.EndInvoke);

incAsync(1).Merge(incAsync(9)).Sum()
    .SubscribeOn(theTardis)
    .Subscribe(n => result = n);

// To the FUTURE!
theTardis.AdvanceBy(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));

Assert.AreEqual(12, result);
share|improve this answer
    
theTardis made me giggle :). Nice piece of information! I fixed it differently: before the assert, I make sure the pipeline is complete by WaitOne() on an AutoResetEvent; the event is Set in the Action<> passed to the end of the chain: Subscribe(n => {res = n; evt.Set();}). Is there a cleaner (Rx-ier) way to wait on the IObservable ? – Cristi Diaconescu Mar 7 '13 at 21:12
    
@CristiDiaconescu The HistoricalScheduler, really - or what you just did by manually waiting on a WaitHandle – JerKimball Mar 7 '13 at 21:18
1  
The best way to do something after an Observable sequence finishes is not to wait, but to add more to the end of Observable (ie. LastOrDefaultAsync().Do()). Or even to await, if you're in an async method. If you must have it block, though, there is the Wait() extension method. – Cory Nelson Mar 7 '13 at 21:19
    
@Cory I can't seem to find any documentation to LastOrDefaultAsync() (link pls?); and, although I can guess what this does (and am aware of the pass-through nature of Do() ), I'm not sure how I would plug it in the existing chain of calls. Can you give an example? – Cristi Diaconescu Mar 7 '13 at 22:03

Here's what a synchronous version looks like - the most direct version of what you've got. Single() will block until the observable completes. Blocking is usually something you want to avoid, but if you're just messing around it's fine.

public void AsynchronousRunInParallel()
{
    Func<int, int> inc = (int x) =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1500);
        return x + 1;
    };

    var incAsync = Observable.FromAsyncPattern<int, int>(inc.BeginInvoke,
                                                         inc.EndInvoke);

    int sum = incAsync(1).Merge(incAsync(9)).Sum().Single();

    Assert.AreEqual(12, sum);
}

And an asynchronous TPL version, using await:

public async Task AsynchronousRunInParallel()
{
    Func<int, int> inc = (int x) =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1500);
        return x + 1;
    };

    var incAsync = Observable.FromAsyncPattern<int, int>(inc.BeginInvoke,
                                                         inc.EndInvoke);

    int sum = await incAsync(1).Merge(incAsync(9)).Sum();

    Assert.AreEqual(12, sum);
}

And finally an asynchronous one which uses Rx Do() -- good if say this was part of a bigger operation:

public async Task AsynchronousRunInParallel()
{
    Func<int, int> inc = (int x) =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1500);
        return x + 1;
    };

    var incAsync = Observable.FromAsyncPattern<int, int>(inc.BeginInvoke,
                                                         inc.EndInvoke);

    await incAsync(1).Merge(incAsync(9)).Sum().Do(sum =>
    {
        Assert.AreEqual(12, sum);
    });
}
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1  
Using the await dramatically simplified my tests. I was fearing having to do polling or the AutoEvent above. Thanks for this! – Gordon Dec 21 '13 at 21:54

It seems to me, that it is a bug in source code and AsynchronousRunInParallel is missing result awaiting which is used for example in TheBloodyHardAsyncInvokationPatter.

When FromAsyncPattern is used, only BeginInvoke is executed in the current thread synchronously. The actual work and result handling will be scheduled on ThreadPool. Thus, execution of Assert will be started as soon as 2 async increments are scheduled, without any wait for completion.

I've added:

ThreadUtils.WaitUntil(() => result != 0.0);

so the result looks like:

        incAsync(1).Merge(incAsync(9)).
            Sum().SubscribeOn(Scheduler.Immediate).
            Subscribe(n => result = n);
        ThreadUtils.WaitUntil(() => result != 0.0);
        Assert.AreEqual(12, result);

Or you may want to replace "Subscribe" with "Run". It is a helper method from Koan itself, which will wait using a manual event:

incAsync(1).Merge(incAsync(9)).
             Sum().SubscribeOn(Scheduler.Immediate).
             Run(n => result = n);
Assert.AreEqual(12, result);
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