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I am using jQuery 1.7. I am trying to get a handle on how namespacing should work. I can get some parts of to work, but not totally as I expect it to work. I expect that when the form element is typed in, the function checkPasswordForm will fire and alert the value of the field.

I have this form element.

<input type='text' id='Password'>

I expect that this code will create a namespace, crate an object, and create a function.

// SET NAMESPACE
var nsPASS = {

$Password: $('#Password'),

checkPasswordForm: function() {
    var Password = $Password.val();
    alert(Password);
}

};
nsPASS.$Password.keyup(nsPASS.checkPasswordForm);

This code doesn't run though. I get an error saying that $Password is not defined. I modified the code a thousand different ways to get it to work. The version below works as I expect it to. It seems like more code than necessary to accomplish the task.

// SET NAMESPACE
var nsPASS = {

$Password: $('#Password'),

init: function() {
    $Password = $('#Password');
},

checkPasswordForm: function() {
    var Password = $Password.val();
    alert(Password);
}

};

nsPASS.init();
nsPASS.$Password.keyup(nsPASS.checkPasswordForm);

In the second example, if I remove nsPASS.init(), the code breaks. If I remove Password: $('#Password') the code breaks.

Can I define objects and then use them immediately in functions? Why does the first example work, but the second doesn't?

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1  
In the second example your init function defines a global variable $Password, it doesn't set the $Password property of the object. –  nnnnnn Mar 7 '13 at 20:32
    
variables & properties are different. –  Peeyush Mar 7 '13 at 20:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

JavaScript does not have namespaces, but only objects. If you have some value on a property of an object, you can't just use the property name like a variable, you will always need to address it via the object.

In the second example, if I remove nsPASS.init(), the code breaks. If I remove Password: $('#Password') the code breaks.

That's because the one is an implicitly global variable (assigned in the init function, used in the checkPasswordForm function) - the other is the property of your nsPass object (initialized in the object literal, used in the nsPASS.$Password.keyup(…) call). So change it to

var Password = nsPass.$Password.val();

If you are writing functions that are always called in context of the namespace object (as methods), you could use the this keyword as a reference to the object. Yet, your particular function will be called as an event handler, so its context is the #Password input itself. You can easily change it to

var Password = $(this).val(); // or shorter: this.value;
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Go back to the first block of code you used. You should be using this:

var Password = nsPASS.$Password.val();

That's the thing with objects like that, you have to always remember to specify where to look for the variable ;)

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