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I have the following table:

CREATE TABLE [Cache].[Marker](
    [ID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [SubID] [varchar](15) NOT NULL,
    [ReadTime] [datetime] NOT NULL,
    [EquipmentID] [varchar](25) NULL,
    [Sequence] [int] NULL
) ON [PRIMARY]

With the following clustered index:

CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED INDEX [IX_Marker_EquipmentID_ReadTime_SubID] ON [Cache].[Marker] 
(
    [EquipmentID] ASC,
    [ReadTime] ASC,
    [SubID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
GO

And this query:

Declare @EquipmentId nvarchar(50)

Set @EquipmentId = 'KLM52B-MARKER'

SELECT TOP 1 
    cr.C44DistId,
    cr.C473RightLotId
From Cache.Marker m
    INNER JOIN Cache.vwCoaterRecipe AS cr ON cr.MarkerId = m.ID
Where m.EquipmentID = @EquipmentId And m.ReadTime >= '3/1/2013'
ORDER BY m.Id desc  

Here is the query plan being generated:

enter image description here

My question is this. Why isn't the clustered index on the Cache.Marker table being used with a seek instead of a scan on another index? Furthermore, SSMS query analyzer is suggesting I add an index on Marker.ReadTime with ID and EquipmentID columns included.

There are roughly 1M rows in the Cache.Marker table.

share|improve this question
    
@pst - I don't follow you. –  Randy Minder Mar 7 '13 at 20:43
1  
can you run a test where you replace @EquipmentID with 'KLM52B-MARKER' in the query? Do you get the desired index without the variable? –  bobs Mar 7 '13 at 20:49
3  
Why do people always think the clustered index is always the fastest way to satisfy any query? –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 7 '13 at 20:59
1  
I don't know who commented that my comment wasn't helpful and then deleted their comment, but I will respond with: my comment wasn't meant to be helpful. It's a serious question. –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 7 '13 at 21:14
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How many unique equipment ID's do you have? It's probably decided date is a better first lookup (perhaps mistakenly). You can force it to use your index though with the WITH( INDEX() ) statement. FORCESEEK can help as well. I highly recommend this because then index behavior is predictable as databases grow to large sizes.

SELECT TOP 1 
    cr.C44DistId,
    cr.C473RightLotId
From Cache.Marker m
     WITH ( INDEX( IX_Marker_EquipmentID_ReadTime_SubID ), FORCESEEK )
    INNER JOIN Cache.vwCoaterRecipe AS cr 
    ON cr.MarkerId = m.ID
Where m.EquipmentID = @EquipmentId And m.ReadTime >= '3/1/2013'
ORDER BY m.Id desc  
share|improve this answer
1  
hmm, 24 unique equipment ID values might indicate low selectivity. –  bobs Mar 7 '13 at 20:49
3  
@RandyMinder With only 24 different IDs, SQL Server has decided that it's not very selective (on a million rows). It feels that using date is a better option. Test both. It's often wrong. –  ThinkingStiff Mar 7 '13 at 20:50
1  
@bobs The problem with this approach becomes apparent when then database hits a certain size. All the sudden, a query will go from running in under a second to taking 5 minutes, with no warning. If you test up front and select the best query plan, and then force SQL to use it, your slowdown is predictable. Gradually your query will go from one second, and then three, etc. When it gets past a threshold, you can redo the plan. –  ThinkingStiff Mar 7 '13 at 21:02
2  
The forcing of an index, which I wouldn't do in production code anyway, didn't really help. Yes, SQL Server uses it, but it's scanning it. –  Randy Minder Mar 7 '13 at 21:05
1  
@ThinkingStiff - I think what I probably need to do is to change the clustered index so that ReadTime is the first column and EquipmentId is next. Since the selectivity of EquipmentId is so low, the index will never be used when querying on EquipmentId. Most of my queries on this table include ReadTime anyway, so that seems to make sense. –  Randy Minder Mar 7 '13 at 21:13
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