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I have this javascript function which serves an AJAX request to an external PHP Script, I want this to auto update a HTML <div> if the new check is different from the old check.

<script>
window.setInterval(function()
{
  $(function () 
  {
    $.ajax({                                      
        url: 'api.php', data: "", dataType: 'json',  success: function(rows)        
        {
            for (var i in rows)
            {
                var row = rows[i];          
                var id = row[0];
                var vname = row[1];
                var Password = row[2]
                $('#output').append("<hr />").append("<b>id: </b>"+id+"<b> name: </b>"+vname+" <b>Password: </b>"+Password);
            } 
        } 
    });       
  });
 }, 5000);
  </script>

This currently sucessfully returns and updates the div with the content from the array, the problem is, since adding the window.setInterval(function() line, it will server the connection every 5 seconds and update the <div> with duplicate data.. when all I want, it for it to echo the new data (if there is a ny)

Here is my other PHP script:

$STD = new mysqli ("localhost", "root", "hidden", "ajaxrequests");

        $array = array(); 
    $Query = $STD->prepare ("SELECT * FROM ajaxdata");
    $Query->execute();
    $Query->bind_result($ID, $Name, $Password);

    while ($Query->fetch())
    {
        $array[] = array ( $ID, $Name, $Password);
    }

  echo json_encode($array);
share|improve this question
    
Why use append instead of just writing the entire output? Alternatively, if you want to work with the JSON string itself and assuming the JSON string is not too large, perhaps you just store teh most recent string to a variable, compare it to the incoming string and do nothing if they match. If they don't match then overwrite the entire DOM element with the new data. –  Mike Brant Mar 7 '13 at 20:46
    
@MikeBrant Could you provide an example? –  user2146021 Mar 7 '13 at 20:49
    
@MikeBrant Furthermore, as it is set up, it is already sending requests every 5 seconds and storing the response. Why not just replace the content with every request? Comparing the returned content and current content will take longer than simply updating the DOM regardless (as the browser cache is very efficient). If your response is really large then you might want to hash it server-side and only compare hashes browser-side to check for updates. –  Edgar Allan Pwn Mar 7 '13 at 20:52
    
Does ajaxdata have an auto-incremented id? If have a javascript variable that stores the last id pulled. Then add that as POST or GET data to your ajax call. Then only pull the new entries and send them along with the new last id. Only append to html if new data is received. –  Pitchinnate Mar 7 '13 at 20:52
    
@Pitchinnate Yes, ajaxdata has A_I set for the ID column but an answer has already been sorted –  user2146021 Mar 7 '13 at 20:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just add a call to empty() before your loop.

<script>
window.setInterval(function()
{
  $(function () 
  {
    $.ajax({                                      
        url: 'api.php', data: "", dataType: 'json',  success: function(rows)        
        {
            $('#output').empty();
            for (var i in rows)
            {
                var row = rows[i];          
                var id = row[0];
                var vname = row[1];
                var Password = row[2]
                $('#output').append("<hr />").append("<b>id: </b>"+id+"<b> name: </b>"+vname+" <b>Password: </b>"+Password);
            } 
        } 
    });       
  });
 }, 5000);
 </script>

Of course if your data size is large, this would not be very optimal. I would actually suggest having the PHP server send a timestamp value with it's response. You could then pass this back in subsequent AJAX requests and have the server determine if there are actually updates to deliver since that last timestamp. You could then have the server only send those updated records, which you could append/update similar to how you are already doing it.

share|improve this answer
    
I would +1 but i don't have 15 re. But i will accept this as the answer when the timer is up. Thankyou for a response, and i'm not asking for an example.. but the way I have implimented, is there a easier way to sort this out? just a simple yes or no answer would surfice –  user2146021 Mar 7 '13 at 20:55
    
@user2146021 As with everything in the programming world, the best approach is oftentimes specific to your use case. If I was dealing with large datasets, I certainly would not want to pass the the full data set every 5 seconds and then ask the client browser to update it in full. I would look at ways to pass only incremental data changes between server and client. Your current approach is simple and may meet your needs for the foreseeable future. Only you can decide if it is worth your effort to implement are more optimized approach. –  Mike Brant Mar 7 '13 at 20:58
    
Much appreciated for your time! thanks! –  user2146021 Mar 7 '13 at 21:01

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