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I have a Regex that is behaving rather oddly and I can't figure why. Original Regex:

Regex regex = new Regex(@"(?i)\d\.\d\dv");

This expression returns/matches an equivalent to 1.35V or 1.35v, which is what I want. However, it is not exclusive enough for my program and it returns some strings I don't need.

Modified Regex:

Regex rgx = new Regex(@"(?i)\d\.\d\dv\s");

Simply by adding '\s' to the expression, it matches/returns DDR3, which is not at all what I want. I'm guessing some sort of inversion is occurring, but I don't understand why and I can't seem to find a reference to explain it. All I wanted to do was add a space to the end of expression to filter a few more results.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

EDIT: Here is a functional test case with a generic version of what is going on in my code. Just open a new WPF in Visual Studio, copy and paste, and it should repeat the results for you.

namespace WpfApplication1
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
    /// </summary>
    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }
    Regex rgx1 = new Regex(@"(?i)\d\.\d\dv");
    Regex rgx2 = new Regex(@"(?i)\d\.\d\dv\s");

    string testCase = @"DDR3 Vdd            |            |            |            |            |    1.35v   |";

    string str = null;

    public void IsMatch(string input)
    {
        Match rgx1Match = rgx1.Match(input);
        if (rgx1Match.Success)
        {
            GetInfo(input);
        }
    }
    public void GetInfo(string input)
    {
        Match rgx1Match = rgx1.Match(input);
        Match rgx2Match = rgx2.Match(input);

        string[] tempArray = input.Split();
        int index = 0;

        if (rgx1Match.Success)
        {
            index = GetMatchIndex(rgx1, tempArray);
            str = tempArray[index].Trim();
            global::System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show("First expression match: " + str);
        }
        if (rgx2Match.Success)
        {
            index = GetMatchIndex(rgx2, tempArray);
            str = tempArray[index].Trim();
            System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show(input);
            global::System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show("Second expression match: " + str);
        }
    }
    public int GetMatchIndex(Regex expression, string[] input)
    {
        int index = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; i++)
        {
            if (index < 1)
            {
                Match rgxMatch = expression.Match(input[i]);
                if (rgxMatch.Success)
                {
                    index = i;
                }
            }
        }
        return index;
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        string line;
        IsMatch(testCase);
    }

}

}

The GetMatchesIndex method is called a number of times in other parts of the code without incident, it is just on this one Regex that I've hit a stumbling block.

share|improve this question
1  
Not sure how you're getting the second regular expression to match DDR3. It doesn't for me: ideone.com/pl2PYb –  mellamokb Mar 7 '13 at 20:53
1  
Can't repeat. Are you sure you don't have another regex still called regex instead of rgx and accidentally match on that? –  Joachim Isaksson Mar 7 '13 at 20:53
    
I can't say for certain why it isn't repeatable, because I don't understand why it's occurring. However, the only change that I've made is adding '\s'. If I remove it '\s', DDR3 no longer matches. –  spugm1r3 Mar 7 '13 at 20:59
    
@spugm1r3: Can you provide a complete code sample demonstrating your issue, including the exact string you are validating against the regular expression? If you could provide a working demo on a site like ideone.com, that would be ideal. –  mellamokb Mar 7 '13 at 21:01
    
@mellamokbtheWise, I'll see what I can do. This is a program for work, so I'm going to have to see if I can pull out this one function and "genericize" it. The only problem is I can't provide the files I'm parsing, or even what's really in them. –  spugm1r3 Mar 7 '13 at 21:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The behavior you are seeing has entirely to do with your application logic, and very little to do with the regular expression. In GetMatchIndex, you are defaulting index = 0. So what happens if none of the entries in string[] input match? You get back index = 0, which is the index of DDR3, the first element in string[] input.

You don't see that behavior in the first regular expression, because it matches 1.35v. However, when you add the space to the end, it doesn't match any of the entries in the split input, so you get back the first one by default which happens to be DDR3. Also, if (rgx1Match.Success) doesn't really help, because you check for a match in the entire string first (which does match because there's a space there), and then search for the index after splitting, which removed the spaces!

The fix is pretty simple: When you are returning an index from an array in a programming language that uses 0-based numbering, the standard way to represent "not found" is with -1 so it doesn't get confused with the valid result of 0. So default index to -1 instead and handle a result of -1 as a special case, i.e., display an error message to the user like "No matches".

share|improve this answer
    
Doh. Well, that explains it. Fresh eyes, I guess. Rookie mistake, I assumed because the change was occurring when I changed the Regex, therein lay the problem. Now to fix some broken code. –  spugm1r3 Mar 7 '13 at 21:50
    
@spugm1r3: You may also want to familiarize yourself with the debugger in your IDE, because it can be really helpful to step through the code line by line and see what's going on, rather than "guessing" where the problem lies. At the first sign of some variable containing an unexpected value, you walk back through the logic and try to understand what went wrong. –  mellamokb Mar 7 '13 at 21:53
    
Will do. Such are the growing pains of teaching yourself how to program... thank you , sir. –  spugm1r3 Mar 7 '13 at 21:59
    
@spugm1r3: Indeed, many of us have been down the same path. Good luck! :) –  mellamokb Mar 7 '13 at 21:59

Your question is incorrect:

new Regex(@"(?i)\d\.\d\dv\s").Match("DDR3").Success is false

In fact, the results seem to work exactly as you'd like.

share|improve this answer
    
The question was not incorrect. I had one output, I made a change to the Regex, my output changed, for reasons I didn't understand. As mellamokb the Wise realized, it was matter of missing context for the question. –  spugm1r3 Mar 7 '13 at 21:56

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