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First, yes, this is for an assignment in school, but I am not looking for someone to re-write or overhaul my code in any way. My question is:

I am asked to write a class that creates a Queue that extends Node (the latter as shown below)

public class Node<T>{
  protected      T  data;
  protected Node<T> next; 
}

I have written up (a most likely very crude) method to do this, and a basic test program that stores integer types into a queue (hopefully). I dont know all the professional lingo, I have read the 'generics' documentation but may have missed a key point, I have read up on how a linked list works (their examples have alot more in the Node Class, which is something I'm not allowed to edit in this assignment), as well as circular arrays and such. when I run my code, I get an error that I wasn't expecting, regarding types. I will post my relevent code, can someone please generally explain what I did to get this (rather... where in my code I should have not used ?)

public class Queue<T> extends Node<T> {

    public Node base;
    public Node end;

    public void enqueue(T item) {

        Node newItem = new Node();
        newItem.data = item;
        newItem.next = null;

        if (isEmpty()) { //Sets to item count of 1
            this.base = newItem; //Base becomes the new item
            this.base.next = this.end; //Base Points Next as End
            this.end.next = this.base; //End points to the one before it (base)
        } 
        else { //Sets to item count above 1.
            this.end.next.next = newItem; //The Last Item Now Points Next as the New Item (End is never counted as an item)
            this.end.next = newItem; //End now points to the next final item.
        }

    }

    public T dequeue() {

        if (isEmpty()) {
            return (null);
        }

        else {
            T item = this.base.data;

            if (this.base.next == this.end) {
                this.base = null;
                this.end = null;
            }

            else {
                this.base = this.base.next;
            }

            return (item);
        }

    }

    public int size() {

        int count = 0;

        for (Node node = base; node != null; node = node.next) {
            count++;
        }
        return count;

    }

    public boolean isEmpty() {

        return (base == null);

    }

    public Queue() {

        this.base = null;
        this.end = null;

    }
 }

The TestQueue.java code is:

public class TestQueue {

    public static void main(String args[]) {

        QueueStuff<Integer> firstQueue = new QueueStuff<>();

        firstQueue.enqueue (66);
        firstQueue.enqueue (6);
        firstQueue.enqueue (666);
        firstQueue.enqueue (0);
        firstQueue.enqueue (6666);

        //firstQueue.printQueue();
    }

}

And the Error is as such:

incompatible types. 
   T item = this.base.data;
                     ^
   required: T
   found:    Object
   where T is a Type variable: T extends Object declared in class Queue
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Here:

public Node base;
public Node end;

Should Be:

public Node<T> base;
public Node<T> end;

The thing is: generics are all about type checking in compile time. When you perform the assignment :

T item = this.base.data; 

The compiler does not allow since it does not type check. It does not type check since the :

public Node base; 

is equivalent to:

public Node<Object> base; 
share|improve this answer
    
ahh, ok. thank you. That is a very valid point. edit My last question is this then, how come when I do change that, I end up with an error at the } after public int size() { int count = 0; for (Node node = base; node != null; node = node.next) { count++; } return count; } that says I'm missing a return statement that to me seems to be clearly there? –  user2146047 Mar 7 '13 at 21:32
    
No prob. I have no ideia why do you have that error, check your braces probably. –  fabiim Mar 7 '13 at 21:33
    
I am coding this all in Notepad++, and then using javac filename.java in Windows Powershell –  user2146047 Mar 7 '13 at 21:34
    
please disregard my second question. I misread which file it was in... I have another unfinished method in another related class that that second error referred to. –  user2146047 Mar 7 '13 at 21:39

The problem is that you fields are raw types

public Node base;
public Node end;

which means they are technically treated the same as Node<Object> and because you're generic type T is more specific than Object you can not assign an Object to it. For example you can do

Node test = new Node();
test.data = Integer.valueOf(1);
test.data = "One";

but T in this example is replaced by Integer and that would mean you could be trying this

Node test = new Node()
test.data = "One";
Integer item = test.data; 

P.S I'm not sure that Queue needs to extend Node, just use Node to store data.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you as well for your input on this. That is also useful information. I now have my program working, enqueueing and dequeueing, with some fairly major tweaks to my functionality in those methods (on top of adding the <T> after the node declarations for base and end. –  user2146047 Mar 7 '13 at 22:24
    
No problem, hopefully it' made generics and raw types a little clearer –  Gavin E Mar 7 '13 at 22:33
    
basically, I use <T> type in my classes, so that for the class that contains the main function that calls it, I can declare any Type of value specific to each Queue (like Integer in one queue and String in another)? –  user2146047 Mar 7 '13 at 22:43

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