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I have the following code:

 method1() throws Exception{
 //throws an Exception
 }

 method2() throws Exception{
    method1();
    //do something
 }

 method3() throws Exception{
     method2();
     //do something
 }

 method4() throws Exception{
   try{
       method3();
       //do something
    }catch(Exception e){
       //catch exception
     } 
  }

If an exception occurs in method1(), it bubbles up to method4() and is caught there.

But, I found in some answers to questions similar to this one, in which the exception was thrown in the following way:

 method1() throws Exception{
   //throws an Exception
 }

 method2() throws Exception{
    try{
       method1();
    }catch(Exception e){
        throw e;
    }
  }

What is the best way to re-throw an exception? and why is it better?

In the articles that I read for best practices for 'Exception Handling', they say to throw early and catch late. Does it mean we have to re-throw Exception as much as possible from inner methods?

If my method1() throws an SQLException, should I catch it only in method4() or handle it in method1() itself?

Update: Say, I want to show some message in the UI if an exception occurs in method1(). Then what is the solution? Should I bubble it up or return a value indicating the problem?

method4() will display some message to the UI.

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closed as not constructive by Brian Roach, thkala, OldCurmudgeon, Iswanto San, Glenn Mar 8 '13 at 0:25

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Don't just be willy-nily throwing exceptions. It makes it difficult to re-use your code in many situations. Catch them, log them, and return an invalid value if you can. –  Richard J. Ross III Mar 7 '13 at 21:38
2  
There's no point in catching an exception if you don't intend to handle it in some way, even if it's just writing it to a log. –  Robert Harvey Mar 7 '13 at 21:38
1  
Sometimes you may want to wrap a checked exception in an unchecked exception - this is usually when a library is over zealous with checked exceptions. –  Boris the Spider Mar 7 '13 at 21:39
1  
You can catch expected, so to speak, exceptions in the controller, and then show an appropriate message. Any unexpected exceptions, such as programming errors should in my opinion result in a more severe general error message. –  Magnilex Mar 7 '13 at 21:46
1  
You shouldn't catch the exception unless you expect to do something with it. This could be as simple as catching it to wrap it and re-throw it. Just don't catch it to re-throw the same exception or catch, log, and suppress unless you are certain you cannot recover. If the code you're working on can't handle the exception properly, you should let the exception bubble up the stack to something that can handle it. –  Joe Mar 7 '13 at 22:00

1 Answer 1

Just throwing the exception with throw e; doesn't seem reasonable to me. Use throw if you have declared an own exception class that encapsulates a set of several basic exceptions. Or use it, if your program detects invalidate (business) data, that wouldn't cause an exception itself.

In addition I would try to reduce the number of throw declarations in methods. It's better to make the code more robust against any sorts of exceptions than having lots of exceptions and try catch blocks. Explicitely bubbling an exception all the way up (using throw) makes the program longer and less readable.

Whenever possible, try to process an exception; e.g. if the user tries to open a non existing file, show a warning and return a value, that shows the parent process that something failed.

Throw early means: your methods should validate input data as early as possible and throw a runtime exception, if something is not as specified. Catch late means not at least: avoid catching exceptions, if you can't do anything about it. Let them ratherly bubble up and log them or notify the user (depends on the system)

Check the difference between Exception and RuntimeException too.

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