Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to test a functionality like this:

@Test
    public void testAddTask() {
        FakeApplication fakeApplication = fakeApplication(inMemoryDatabase());
        start(fakeApplication);
        Task task=new Task();
        task.title="test Task";
        task.save();
        assertThat(Task.find.where().ilike("title", "task")).isNull();
        stop(fakeApplication);

    }

which succeed which Is wrong while

@Test
    public void testAddTask(){
        running(fakeApplication(inMemoryDatabase()), new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                Task task=new Task();
                task.title="test Task";
                task.save();
                assertThat(Task.find.where().ilike("title", "task")).isNull();
            }
        });
    }

fails and that's what I expect.

shouldn't startfakeapplicationbehave the same as `running(fakeApplication()?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, it does the same

/**
 * Executes a block of code in a running application.
 */
public static synchronized void running(FakeApplication fakeApplication, final Runnable block) {
    try {
        start(fakeApplication);
        block.run();
    } finally {
        stop(fakeApplication);
    }
}

Cause of difference may be not cleaning after running some other test. running() has try..finally construct, putting stop(fakeApplication); into method annotated with @After is recommended (and initialization of fakeApplication in @Before).

I dislike running() helper method because it doesn't allow to throw exceptions inside run().

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.