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I'm trying to break up a user input string into different variables. The exact format of the user string must be "Tuesday 6:40 PM". I written the program so that once the loop hits the first space the rest of the variables will be filled because only the days name will be different lengths. I've tried this a few times and can't seem to get any sort of output.Anyone know why?

void input( Time & time ){
    string inputTime;
    string charholder;
    string day;
    string hour;
    string minute;
    string amPm;

    cout << "Enter a day and time: ";
    getline(cin, inputTime);

    for (int i = 0; i < inputTime.length() ; i++) {

        charholder = inputTime[i];
        cout << i << endl;

        if (charholder != " ") {
            day[i] = inputTime[i];
        }

        else {
            hour[0] = inputTime[i+1];
            minute[0] = inputTime[i+3];
            minute[1] = inputTime[i+4];
            amPm[0] = inputTime[i+6];
            amPm[1] = inputTime[i+7];
            break;
        }
    }

    cout << day << hour << minute << amPm; 
}

EDIT: CORRECT CODE:

void input( Time & time ){
    string inputTime;
    char charholder;
    string day;
    string hour;
    string minute;
    string amPm;

    cout << "Enter a day and time: ";
    getline(cin, inputTime);

    int i = 0;

    while (charholder != ' ') {

        charholder = inputTime[i];
        i++;
    }

    day = inputTime.substr(0,i);
    hour = inputTime.substr(i,1);
    minute = inputTime.substr(i+2,2);
    amPm = inputTime.substr(i+5,2);

    }
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Why do you have so many strings.. – Rapptz Mar 7 '13 at 22:07
5  
Your code is completely broken, too many issues – nogard Mar 7 '13 at 22:07

Assigning a single char to an std::string is OK. But you have many default constructed strings, which you then try to assign elements to using operator[] and an index. But they are all size 0, so these locations are not valid.

std::string foo; // empty string
foo[0] = 'x':    // Oops! foo[0] holds for the null-termination character. Modifying is UB
foo[1] = 'x':    // Oops! foo[1] is out of bounds
share|improve this answer
    
Would it make a difference if I allocated the memory when I declare the variables i.e, "string day[10];"? – user1681673 Mar 7 '13 at 22:30
    
@user1681673 that would be an array of strings. Maybe you want a string of a certain size? For example, std::string foo(5, 'x') makes a size 5 string where every character is an x. – juanchopanza Mar 7 '13 at 22:38
    
Ah, got it. I'm very new to C++, more use to C. Thanks for the help. – user1681673 Mar 7 '13 at 22:41

This creates a string with length 0.

string hour;

And this does not change the length of the string.

hour[0] = inputTime[i+1];

If you need the string to be a particular length, call std::string::resize()

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