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does anybody know a statement where it would remove duplicates like this from the output?

DEPARTMENT_ID  DEPARTMENT_NAME                FULL_NAME               JOB_TITLE      
 50            Shipping                  Alana Walsh          Sales Representative
 50            Shipping                  Alana Walsh          Sales Representative  
 50            Shipping                  Winston Taylor       Sales Manager   
 50            Shipping                  Winston Taylor       Sales Manager
 60              IT                      Alexander Hunold     Sales Representative
 60              IT                      Alexander Hunold     Sales Representative

here's what i have so far:

select employees.department_id, departments.department_name, first_name || ' ' || last_name as full_name, job_title
from departments, employees, jobs
where employees.department_id = departments.department_id
and job_title like '%Sales%'
order by job_title, full_name;
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

you can use SELECT DISTINCT to remove duplicates.

select distinct employees.department_id, departments.department_name, first_name || ' ' || last_name as full_name, job_title
from departments, employees, jobs
where employees.department_id = departments.department_id
and job_title like '%Sales%'
order by job_title, full_name;

Alternatively you can also use a GROUP BY on each column

select employees.department_id, departments.department_name, first_name || ' ' || last_name as full_name, job_title
from departments, employees, jobs
where employees.department_id = departments.department_id
and job_title like '%Sales%'
group by employees.department_id, departments.department_name, first_name || ' ' || last_name as full_name, job_title
order by job_title, full_name;

It also looks like you're missing a join on jobs? That may be the reason your query is returning duplicate results.

I'd also recommend using explicit join syntax when you can.

FROM departments
 INNER JOIN employees ON employees.department_id = departments.department_id
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You can use a DISTINCT as Matt Busche indicates.

In many, many cases, however, people incorrectly add a DISTINCT to cover up the fact that they are missing a join condition. In your case, you are joining three tables together-- departments, employees, and jobs-- but you only have one join condition. You are, therefore, doing a Cartesian join to the jobs table which is almost certainly not what you want. How does the jobs table relate to the other two tables? If we assume that there is a job_id in both the jobs and the employees table, you would want something like

select employees.department_id, 
       departments.department_name, 
       first_name || ' ' || last_name as full_name, 
       job_title
  from departments, employees, jobs
 where employees.department_id = departments.department_id
   and jobs.job_id             = employees.job_id
   and job_title            like '%Sales%'
 order by job_title, full_name;
share|improve this answer
    
@user2145903 - Assuming that they both have a job_id, yes, you should include that join condition. You didn't tell us what your tables looked like so I guessed at the relationship. –  Justin Cave Mar 7 '13 at 22:29
    
@user2145903 - Bear in mind that we don't have your tables or your data. If you happen to be using the tables in the sample HR schema, then the query I posted should work. Frequently, though, your instructor will create a schema for you to work in that has different tables and different data. –  Justin Cave Mar 7 '13 at 22:36

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