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I have a script that sends out auto-renewal notices to members whose membership is about to expire, based on the last date they purchased a membership in our club's online store:

SELECT members.id, first, last, class, email, name AS membershipType, lifetime, store_transactions.dateModified FROM store_transactions 
LEFT JOIN members ON memberID = members.id 
WHERE 
(
DATE(store_transactions.dateModified) = SUBDATE(CURDATE(), INTERVAL 1 YEAR) 
/*AND 
NOT EXISTS(SELECT * FROM store_transactions WHERE DATE(store_transactions.dateModified) > SUBDATE(CURDATE(), INTERVAL 1 YEAR))*/
)
AND categoryID = 1 AND lifetime != 'Y' 
GROUP BY members.id 
ORDER BY last, first

I ran this script daily via a CRON job, and it worked fine (or so I thought) by sending out an email to all members who purchased a membership exactly one year ago. However, I didn't take into account the fact that a member could renew their membership prior to my script sending out an auto-reminder).

**UPDATE: While trying to implement the solution several of you have recommended (THANK YOU!), here's what I currently have as my query:

SELECT members.id, first, last, class, email, name AS membershipType, lifetime, store_transactions.dateModified, categoryID FROM store_transactions 
LEFT JOIN members ON memberID = members.id 
GROUP BY members.id
HAVING categoryID = 1 AND lifetime != 'Y'
AND DATE(MAX(store_transactions.dateModified)) = '2012-03-24' /* specific date to simplify debugging */
ORDER BY last, first

I feel this is very close to the correct solution, but the GROUP BY tends to break my logic (that's in my head), due to the fact that my store_transactions table has different categories of transactions, which can be by the same member (i.e. membership, event ticket, advertisement, donation, etc.). For the purposes of this query, I'm only interested in looking at membership-category transactions ("categoryID = 1"). The additional "lifetime != 'Y'" prohibits this query from returning lifetime-members, whose membership never expires.

In summary, I want this query to return the records of members who have a transaction of "categoryID = 1" exactly one year ago, UNLESS they have a more recent transaction with "categoryID = 1". Here's the fields in my store_transactions table in case it helps:

id invoice memberID categoryID productID name price quantity dateModified addedBy

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1  
so if someone made a subsquent purchase it would be in the same table? Then you could select the MAX(store_transactions.dateModified) –  Horen Mar 7 '13 at 22:17
    
Thanks Horen. I believe your tip is good, but I'm having trouble implementing (see below). Also, I'll update my code above to show the latest. –  psterling Mar 17 '13 at 15:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try checking the MAX(store_transactions.dateModified).

SELECT members.id
FROM store_transactions 
LEFT JOIN members ON memberID = members.id 
GROUP BY members.id
HAVING DATE(MAX(store_transactions.dateModified)) > SUBDATE(CURDATE(), INTERVAL 1 YEAR) 

I simplified it a bit but you should get the right idea.

EDIT:

You can use both WHERE and HAVING. The where goes before the GROUP BY and filters individual rows that do, or do not, meet the conditions. The having clause includes aggregates over the groups.

SELECT members.id
FROM store_transactions
LEFT JOIN members ON memberID = members.id 
WHERE categoryID = 1 AND lifetime != 'Y'
GROUP BY members.id
HAVING DATE(MAX(store_transactions.dateModified)) > SUBDATE(CURDATE(), INTERVAL 1 YEAR) 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help--I apologize for my delayed response! I feel this almost is the correct solution for me, however placing the GROUP BY members.id before the HAVING (rather than after the WHERE) breaks my logic. While all transactions are logged in a single table, they can be of different categories (members can purchase a membership, advertisement, event ticket, etc. in a single transaction). I only want to look at the 'membership' transactions, but by using GROUP BY members.id prior to the HAVING, it disregards the possibility for different categories per member. Is this an easy fix? –  psterling Mar 17 '13 at 15:29
    
Check the edit in my answer, I think this is what you want. –  JodyT Mar 17 '13 at 16:58
    
THANK YOU JodyT! Your solution was just what I needed--and I learned a few new MySQL tricks in the process! The only thing that I really needed to change was substitute the '>' for '=' so it would return the results only from a single date. Thank You!! I'd vote your answer up, but I guess I still have a "bad" reputation! –  psterling Mar 17 '13 at 23:13

Perhaps something like

WHERE (0 in (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM store_transactions WHERE ...))

would work?

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Thanks for the suggestion. I'll try if I can't get the other method to work... –  psterling Mar 17 '13 at 15:43

Alternate idea, though I think I prefer JodyT's DATE(MAX(dateModified)) method:

WHERE pk NOT IN (SELECT pk FROM store_transactions WHERE DATE(store_transactions.dateModified) > SUBDATE(CURDATE(), INTERVAL 1 YEAR))

(Where pk is some unique key on your table)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. I'll try if I can't get JodyT's method to work... –  psterling Mar 17 '13 at 15:43

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