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I'm working with some simple data structures and collections in Scala and I've noticed what I think is strange behavior. Here's the object:

class State (protected val trackmap: Map[Int, List[String]]) {

  override def clone : State = {
    new State(Map() ++ trackmap)
  }

  override def toString = { "State: " + trackmap.toString }

  def equals (other: State) : Boolean = {
    //println("Comparing " + trackmap + " to " + other.trackmap)
    trackmap == other.trackmap  

  }

  def == (other: State) : Boolean = {
    this equals other
  }
}

And my related tests:

  test("state equality") {
    val state = new State( Map(1 -> List("engine"), 2 -> List("a"), 3 -> List("b")) )

    expect(true) { state equals state.clone }
    expect(true) { state == state.clone }
    expect(false) { state == new State(Map(1 -> List("a"))) }
    expect(false) { state equals new State(Map(1 -> List("a"))) }

    expect(true) { List(state).exists( _.equals (state.clone) )}
    expect(true) { List(state).exists( _.== (state.clone) )}
    expect(true) { List(state).contains( state.clone )}
  }

All of them pass except for the last one, which I expect should pass. I haven't looked at the Scala source, but I assume contains would be implemented basically as the second exists call.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You are not overriding the actual equals method of Scala, that is why it behaves strangely. Re-write your equals method as this, and things should work:

override def equals (other: Any) : Boolean = {
    other match{
      case that: State =>
        //println("Comparing " + trackmap + " to " + other.trackmap)
        trackmap == that.trackmap
      case _ => false
    }
}

See, equals method in Scala takes a parameter of type Any not State, and you need to add the override keyword for it.

BTW, you don't even need the == method, as Scala automatically remaps it to equals method!

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Note that this can also be evidenced by the fact that while List(state).exists( _ == state.clone ) returns true, List(state).exists( _ == (state.clone:Any) ) returns false. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Mar 7 '13 at 22:50
1  
using pattern matching in your equals implementation would be much more idiomatic than the isInstanceOf/asInstanceOf combo. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Mar 8 '13 at 10:58
    
Yeah true. I will fix it now. thanks for the suggestion (I am still a bit Javaish about Scala) –  Amanj Sherwany Mar 8 '13 at 12:52
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Your equals method isn't being called by contains, because you didn't override the default implementation on Any. The clue to this is that the compiler doesn't complain about the lack of an override modifier.

The correct method signature would be

override def equals(other: Any): Boolean

When you called List(state).exists( _.equals (state.clone), it resolved to your implementation, because the compiler knew the type of the argument was State. Thus it chose the overloaded variant of the method which was specialized to that type.

The signature of contains always takes an argument of type Any, regardless of the type parameter of the List, so the method call will resolve to the default implementation of equals.

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Your implementation of equals and == is not as it should be. For that reason Scala has the case class.

Your class would then look like this

case class State(protected val trackmap: Map[Int, List[String]]) {

  override def clone: State = {
    new State(Map() ++ trackmap)
  }

  override def toString = { "State: " + trackmap.toString }
}

If you wanted to implement them manually you would need to implement the Equals trait. And override the following methods:

override def canEqual(other: Any) = 
  other.isInstanceOf[State]

override def equals(other: Any) = {
  other match {
    case that: State => (that canEqual this) && trackmap == that.trackmap
    case _ => false
  }
}

override def hashCode() = {
  val prime = 41
  prime + trackmap.hashCode
}
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+1 for mention about hashCode(). –  Brian Hsu Mar 7 '13 at 23:55
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