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I know this question has been asked before but I still haven't seen a satisfactory answer, or a definitive "no, this cannot be done", so I'll ask again!

All I want to do is get the path to the currently running executable, either as an absolute path or relative to where the executable is invoked from, in a platform-independent fashion. I though boost::filesystem::initial_path was the answer to my troubles but that seems to only handle the 'platform-independent' part of the question - it still returns the path from which the application was invoked.

For a bit of background, this is a game using Ogre, which I'm trying to profile using Very Sleepy, which runs the target executable from its own directory, so of course on load the game finds no configuration files etc. and promptly crashes. I want to be able to pass it an absolute path to the configuration files, which I know will always live alongside the executable. The same goes for debugging in Visual Studio - I'd like to be able to run $(TargetPath) without having to set the working directory.

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3  
stackoverflow.com/questions/1023306/… and others –  dmckee Oct 7 '09 at 0:15
5  
Note that it is impossible to prove the absence of an answer, therefore you can't get a definitive NO. I'll be happy to give you an authoritative NO :) –  MSalters Oct 7 '09 at 11:52
    
possible duplicate of how to find the location of the executable in C –  ergosys Sep 10 '11 at 18:56
    
"on load the game finds no configuration files etc." so the game searches for configuration files on the current directory? That's a bad idea, and potentially a security vulnerability. Configuration files should be stored in a standard location. –  curiousguy Nov 27 '11 at 5:05
    
Sure, but there are plenty of programs out there that come in a "portable" version where all configuration is stored alongside the executable. I imagine at least someone has come up with a way of doing this that's not a security risk :) –  Ben Hymers Dec 8 '11 at 22:07

11 Answers 11

up vote 35 down vote accepted

There is no cross platform way that I know.

For Linux: readlink /proc/self/exe

Windows: GetModuleFileName

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4  
Platform independence is simply a matter of hiding the platform dependency. In this case using the predefined OS macros detailed at predef.sourceforge.net/preos.html to select the method is straightforward. –  Clifford Oct 7 '09 at 15:02
1  
So is this what everyone does whenever they want to find the executable's path in C++? I was hoping something as simple-sounding as this would already be implemented in a library like boost. –  Ben Hymers Oct 12 '09 at 19:53
    
I suppose I did ask for either a method or 'no', and this is both, so I'll accept it :) –  Ben Hymers Jul 25 '10 at 14:04
1  
@curiousguy I'm not sure I understand you; I'm pretty sure that's the whole point of this question :) –  Ben Hymers Dec 8 '11 at 22:08
1  
@curiousguy: You'd want to do it if, for example, your program might get installed in a directory of the user's choosing. You need to be able to find your executable and its support files somehow. –  greyfade Jun 25 '12 at 3:11

This way uses boost + argv. You mentioned this may not be cross platform because it may or may not include the executable name. Well the following code should work around that.

#include <boost/filesystem/operations.hpp>

#include <boost/filesystem/path.hpp>

#include <iostream>

namespace fs = boost::filesystem;


int main(int argc,char** argv)
{
    fs::path full_path( fs::initial_path<fs::path>() );

    full_path = fs::system_complete( fs::path( argv[0] ) );

    std::cout << full_path << std::endl;

    //Without file name
    std::cout << full_path.stem() << std::endl;
    //std::cout << fs::basename(full_path) << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

The following code gets the current working directory which may do what you need

#include <boost/filesystem/operations.hpp>
#include <boost/filesystem/path.hpp>

#include <iostream>

namespace fs = boost::filesystem;


int main(int argc,char** argv)
{
    //current working directory
    fs::path full_path( fs::current_path<fs::path>() );

    std::cout << full_path << std::endl;

    std::cout << full_path.stem() << std::endl;
    //std::cout << fs::basepath(full_path) << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Note Just realized that basename() was deprecated so had to switch to .stem()

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stem seems to give me just the executable minus the path and extension on Windows, but that's a minor point. What I'd like to know is how this works around argv[0] being possibly incorrect? It works for me testing on Windows, but then argv[0] is actually being passed in as the absolute path of the executable, which makes system_complete's job pretty easy :) –  Ben Hymers Oct 12 '09 at 19:47
    
No -- he doesn't need the working directory. and NO argv doesn't help. What do you do when argv contains only the executable name? What to do, when the program was invoked via a symlink? –  Ichthyo Feb 1 '11 at 1:47

I'm not sure about Linux, yet try this for Windows:

#include <windows.h>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std ;

int main()
{
    char ownPth[MAX_PATH]; 

    // Will contain exe path
    HMODULE hModule = GetModuleHandle(NULL);
    if (hModule != NULL)
    {
     // When passing NULL to GetModuleHandle, it returns handle of exe itself
     GetModuleFileName(hModule,ownPth, (sizeof(ownPth))); 

     // Use above module handle to get the path using GetModuleFileName()
     cout << ownPth << endl ;
     system("PAUSE");
     return 0;
    }
    else
    {
     cout << "Module handle is NULL" << endl ;
     system("PAUSE");
     return 0;
    }
}
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Note that one must use WCHAR ownPth.., wrapped around a #ifdef UNICODE in the event that one compiles with Unicode support. If not, use the code provided. –  Dr1Ku Feb 21 '13 at 13:12
    
just for the record I am just having a funny case where GetModuleDirectory returns a path with the ".." parts in it, like if it was taking the string pure raw from the command line lol. actually in this case visual studio is launching the process and the .. is part of the debugging path. something like $(projectDir)../some.exe I used PathCanonicalize from Shwlib but one needs to link against this lib. this may not be desirable. –  v.oddou Jun 29 at 8:13

For Windows you can use GetModuleFilename().
For Linux see BinReloc.

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For windows:

GetModuleFileName - returns the exe path + exe filename

To remove filename
PathRemoveFileSpec

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This works for me:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std ;

int main( int argc, char** argv)
{
    cout << argv[0] << endl ; ;
    return 0;
}
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10  
I've seen on other SO questions that this doesn't always work, and that argv[0] can contain the absolute path to the executable, just the file name of the executable, or any other rubbish. –  Ben Hymers Oct 6 '09 at 22:08
    
Quite possibly so. –  Clifford Oct 7 '09 at 14:58
3  
One should never trust argv[0] if they're attempting to open 'support files' or the like. Argv is subject to change, and any caller that is evil can change the value of this. Avoid unless you're using it for logging, etc., NOT for constructing paths used to open files. –  Qix Oct 28 '11 at 10:46
1  
@Di-0xide: Yes, I conceded that fact in response to Ben's comment - two years ago! It would depend entirely on its use whether the "quick-and-dirty" solution were acceptable or not. I let the answer stand purely for completeness, not because it was best practice. The voting already reflected that before you decremented it! –  Clifford Oct 28 '11 at 17:31

This is a Windows specific way, but it is at least half of your answer.

GetThisPath.h

/// dest is expected to be MAX_PATH in length.
/// returns dest
///     TCHAR dest[MAX_PATH];
///     GetThisPath(dest, MAX_PATH);
TCHAR* GetThisPath(TCHAR* dest, size_t destSize);

GetThisPath.cpp

#include <Shlwapi.h>
#pragma comment(lib, "shlwapi.lib")

TCHAR* GetThisPath(TCHAR* dest, size_t destSize)
{
    if (!dest) return NULL;
    if (MAX_PATH > destSize) return NULL;

    DWORD length = GetModuleFileName( NULL, dest, destSize );
    PathRemoveFileSpec(dest);
    return dest;
}

mainProgram.cpp

TCHAR dest[MAX_PATH];
GetThisPath(dest, MAX_PATH);

I would suggest using platform detection as preprocessor directives to change the implementation of a wrapper function that calls GetThisPath for each platform.

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For Linux:
Function to execute system command

int syscommand(string aCommand, string & result) {
    FILE * f;
    if ( !(f = popen( aCommand.c_str(), "r" )) ) {
            cout << "Can not open file" << endl;
            return NEGATIVE_ANSWER;
        }
        const int BUFSIZE = 4096;
        char buf[ BUFSIZE ];
        if (fgets(buf,BUFSIZE,f)!=NULL) {
            result = buf;
        }
        pclose( f );
        return POSITIVE_ANSWER;
    }

Then we get app name

string getBundleName () {
    pid_t procpid = getpid();
    stringstream toCom;
    toCom << "cat /proc/" << procpid << "/comm";
    string fRes="";
    syscommand(toCom.str(),fRes);
    size_t last_pos = fRes.find_last_not_of(" \n\r\t") + 1;
    if (last_pos != string::npos) {
        fRes.erase(last_pos);
    }
    return fRes;
}

Then we extract application path

    string getBundlePath () {
    pid_t procpid = getpid();
    string appName = getBundleName();
    stringstream command;
    command <<  "readlink /proc/" << procpid << "/exe | sed \"s/\\(\\/" << appName << "\\)$//\"";
    string fRes;
    syscommand(command.str(),fRes);
    return fRes;
    }

Do not forget to trim the line after

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Using args[0] and looking for '/' (or '\\'):

#include <string>
#include <iostream> // to show the result

int main( int numArgs, char *args[])
{
    // Get the last position of '/'
    string aux(args[0]);

    // get '/' or '\\' depending on unix/mac or windows.
#if defined(_WIN32) || defined(WIN32)
    int pos = aux.rfind('\\');
#else
    int pos = aux.rfind('/');
#endif

    // Get the path and the name
    string path = aux.substr(0,pos+1);
    string name = aux.substr(pos+1);
    // show results
    cout << "Path: " << path << endl;
    cout << "Name: " << name << endl;
}

EDITED: If '/' does not exist, pos==-1 so the result is correct.

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What if '/' isn't present in the path? There's no checking of that case and I believe it's quite likely - Windows will use backslashes, and args[0] may not actually be a path at all. –  Ben Hymers Jul 10 at 13:07
    
If '/' does not exist, rfind return -1, so "path"=aux.substr(0,0) and "name" = aux.substr(0): the result is correct. Related with Windows, you are right, '/' must be changed to '\\', I will change to allow windows too. I have also tested for filenames with '/', but this last is codified and does not create problems. –  Adrian Maire Jul 11 at 11:23
    
It's more the part about args[0] not necessarily being the executable path that bothers me. Thanks for fixing your answer for Windows though :) –  Ben Hymers Jul 12 at 9:48

in Unix(including Linux) try 'which', in Windows try 'where'.

#include <stdio.h>

#define _UNIX

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
        char cmd[128];
        char buf[128];
        FILE* fp = NULL;
#if defined(_UNIX)
        sprintf(cmd, "which %s > my.path", argv[0]);
#else
        sprintf(cmd, "where %s > my.path", argv[0]);
#endif
        system(cmd);
        fp = fopen("my.path", "r");
        fgets(buf, sizeof(buf), fp);
        fclose(fp);

        printf("full path: %s\n", buf);
        unlink("my.path");

        return 0;
}
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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  silverback Mar 19 at 5:48
char exePath[512];
CString strexePath;
GetModuleFileName(NULL,exePath,512);
strexePath.Format("%s",exePath);
strexePath = strexePath.Mid(0,strexePath.ReverseFind('\\'));
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That's Windows-only and uses MFC, so quite far from being cross-platform, sorry! –  Ben Hymers Feb 20 at 14:32

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