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Friends,

I have had a client data sent to me in that is requested to have fields terminated by '|'

Problem is, some of the filed values also have the "|" as a character that we need to preserve.

Problem rows in my datafile look like this (the '|' in the addres "1|34-36 ..." is the issue)

    ID  |   Address                |UPDATEDATE
  1423  |   1|34-36 White Street   |02/01/199

my .ctl looks like this

options(errors=1000)
load data
into table client_address APPEND
fields terminated by '|'
TRAILING NULLCOLS
(
ID          INTEGER EXTERNAL,
share|improve this question
1  
There is no way you can reliably parse that file unless the values that contain the delimiter e.g. use quotes or some other way to "escape" the delimiter. – a_horse_with_no_name Mar 7 '13 at 23:16
1  
And you can't get them to send it with a different separator? Like ~? – thursdaysgeek Mar 7 '13 at 23:16

If all fields in data file are width-aligned, you could use this .ctl file:

load data
into table client_address APPEND
fields terminated by '~'
TRAILING NULLCOLS
(
line         BOUNDFILLER,
ID           "to_number(trim(substr(:line,1,8)))",
Address      "trim(substr(:line,10,26))",
UPDATEDATE   "to_date(trim(substr(:line,37)),'mm/dd/yyyy')"
)

EDIT :
If fields are not width-aligned, but Address is the only field which can contain '|' char inside, then use this .ctl file

load data
into table client_address APPEND
fields terminated by '~'
TRAILING NULLCOLS
(
line         BOUNDFILLER,
ID           "to_number(trim(regexp_substr(:line,'^[^|]*')))",
Address      "trim(regexp_replace(:line,'^[^|]*\|(.*)\|[^|]*$','\1'))",
UPDATEDATE   "to_date(trim(regexp_substr(:line,'[^|]*$')),'mm/dd/yyyy')"
)
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