Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Eclipse, is there any way to find which return statement a method returned from without logging flags at every return statment?

For example:

@Override
 public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (this == obj) {
        return true;
    }
    if (obj == null) {
        return false;
    }
    if (!(obj instanceof ABC)) {
        return false;
    }
    ABC other = (ABC) obj;
    if (var1 == null) {
        if (other.var1 != null) {
            return false;
        }
    } else if (!var1.equals(other.var1)) {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

In this case, how do I find out at which point my equals method returned?

share|improve this question
12  
Use the debugger and set a breakpoint on each return statement. –  Marvo Mar 7 '13 at 23:04
    
Maybe this is why a good practice is to make one single return per function... –  m4573r Mar 7 '13 at 23:07
    
@Marvo This will work. I can go into debug mode and execute line-by-line. I wouldn't want to put breakpoints on the 150 returns that this equals function has. Thanks. –  Alastor Moody Mar 7 '13 at 23:10
2  
@AlastorMoody You can also put a breakpoint at the beginning of the method, and then step through the method line by line. –  Cory Kendall Mar 7 '13 at 23:13
    
@CoryKendall That's what I did and successfully figured out the problem. Thanks everyone for all the help. –  Alastor Moody Mar 8 '13 at 17:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, but a more understandable and debug friendly code can be with a boolean local variable that represents the result.

then you can see with debugger who assign it when and the return value before returned.

share|improve this answer
1  
So does the debugger pause while accessing a variable if I have put a breakpoint at the variable declaration? I will have to try that out. –  Alastor Moody Mar 7 '13 at 23:11
1  
It would not pause at each access, but you would have to assign the variable to false instead of the return and handle the boolean at the end. You can assign breakpoints at each place where you assign the variable to false –  Ron Mar 7 '13 at 23:16

No. This is one reason that some people prefer single point of exit: Why should a function have only one exit-point?

Note also the links in the first comment on that question.

share|improve this answer

Use breakpoints in debug mode.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.