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I have a query that takes 2.5 seconds with FULL JOIN, and 40 seconds with INNER, RIGHT or LEFT JOIN.

Here is the query. The subquery (done twice) only takes 1.3 seconds on its own.

SELECT T1.[time], T1.Total, T1.rn, T2.[time], T2.Total, T2.rn
FROM
(
select [time], MAX(ComputedValue) as Total, row_number() over (order by [time]) as rn
FROM
(
    select SUBSTRING(CONVERT(CHAR(10), IntervalStartTime, 108), 0, 6) as [time], ComputedValue
    from LoadTestTransactionSample
    where LoadTestRunId=285
    and CounterName='Total Transactions' 
    and TransactionName='Export'
) foo
group by [time]
) T1
_____ JOIN
(
select [time], MAX(ComputedValue) as Total, row_number() over (order by [time]) as rn
FROM
(
    select SUBSTRING(CONVERT(CHAR(10), IntervalStartTime, 108), 0, 6) as [time], ComputedValue
    from LoadTestTransactionSample
    where LoadTestRunId=285
    and CounterName='Total Transactions' 
    and TransactionName='Export'
) foo
group by [time]
) T2
ON T1.rn = T2.rn - 1

The select SUBSTRING bit is just getting an HH:MM string out of a DateTime. LoadTestTransactionSample is actually a VIEW that joins across 8 tables. (FYI the database is a Visual Studio load test results store). Here are its (relevant) columns:

LoadTestRunId INT NOT NULL
CounterName NVARCHAR(255) NOT NULL
TransactionName NVARCHAR(64) NOT NULL
IntervalStartTime DATETIME NOT NULL
IntervalEndTime DATETIME NOT NULL
ComputedValue REAL

A FULL JOIN returns an extra unwanted row, so I do need to do a RIGHT JOIN to get the right answer.

I'm not really looking for a solution (I have one: pre-fetch the subquery into a table variable use SQL Server 2012 analytic function 'LAG', thanks @a1ex07), just some understanding as to what could possibly cause the extreme difference in performance between these join types.


EDIT: Here's the slow right join query plan and the fast full join query plan. They are too big to post a screenshot.

EDIT 2: Actually the query plans have the RIGHT JOIN at 45% and FULL JOIN at 55%, which turns out to be utterly inaccurate (in reality it ends up worse than 99%/1%). I guess this means I have to rely on the actual execution statistics.

EDIT 3: Statistics for the slow RIGHT JOIN:

(40 row(s) affected)
Table 'LoadTestPerformanceCounterCategory'. Scan count 0, logical reads 37556, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'LoadTestPerformanceCounter'. Scan count 0, logical reads 176464, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'LoadTestScenario'. Scan count 0, logical reads 176464, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'LoadTestCase'. Scan count 0, logical reads 176464, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'WebLoadTestTransaction'. Scan count 0, logical reads 13411100, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'LoadTestPerformanceCounterInstance'. Scan count 0, logical reads 36563718, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'LoadTestPerformanceCounterSample'. Scan count 19721, logical reads 269657, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'LoadTestRunInterval'. Scan count 41, logical reads 205, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.

SQL Server Execution Times:
    CPU time = 36754 ms,  elapsed time = 36763 ms.

Statistics for the fast FULL JOIN:

(41 row(s) affected)
Table 'Worktable'. Scan count 0, logical reads 0, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'LoadTestPerformanceCounterCategory'. Scan count 0, logical reads 1832, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'LoadTestPerformanceCounter'. Scan count 0, logical reads 8608, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'LoadTestScenario'. Scan count 0, logical reads 8608, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'LoadTestCase'. Scan count 0, logical reads 8608, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'WebLoadTestTransaction'. Scan count 0, logical reads 654200, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'LoadTestPerformanceCounterInstance'. Scan count 0, logical reads 1783596, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'LoadTestPerformanceCounterSample'. Scan count 962, logical reads 13154, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.
Table 'LoadTestRunInterval'. Scan count 2, logical reads 10, physical reads 0, read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.

SQL Server Execution Times:
    CPU time = 1950 ms,  elapsed time = 1944 ms.

The RIGHT JOIN is doing massively more reads and more scans than the FULL JOIN, despite an apparently similar query plan.

Is Worktable (in FULL JOIN) a hint? Is that a temp table?

Does this seem to suggest that the query optimizer is broken?

share|improve this question
1  
Set your query plan/display statistics on and see. Without having the DDL scripts to be able to replicate your schema and data, any answer is basically a guess. Also, are these performance figures different on the first query as on subsequent queries? That's an indication that your cache is getting involved. –  Heather Mar 7 '13 at 23:26
1  
I think Heather means to ask you to run them 1-2-3-4 and then 4-3-2-1 and compare –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 7 '13 at 23:28
1  
Also, each version of the query generates its own query plan in cache, and these are not necessarily refreshed at the same time. This can lead to occasional performance conundrums. –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 7 '13 at 23:30
1  
What version of SQLServer do you use? In 2012 they finally implemented LAG and LEAD which may improve this particular case ... –  a1ex07 Mar 7 '13 at 23:37
    
The results are consistent with repeated executions - doesn't seem to be affected by caching. I'm new to reading execution plans... I'll take a look. It's SQL Server 2012 -- I'll look up LAG and LEAD. –  agentnega Mar 7 '13 at 23:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

OK, it turns out the answer is: bad db statistics. Very bad. As in, never been updated.

exec sp_updatestats; FTW.

[hides head in shame]

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This is Execution plan for similar queries. Tables are very small.

Execution Plan

Query 1:

  • Uses INNER JOIN.
  • Execution plan looks to be smaller.
  • However, takes 62% of the total time.

Query 2:

  • Uses FULL JOIN.
  • Execution plan looks to be big.
  • However, takes 38% of the total time.

Reason : INNER JOIN in my case is using HASH MATCH. And FULL JOIN is using NESTED LOOP. This is decided by SQL optimizer that which physical join must be used(however we can for it use other physical join). Check your execution plan , it will help.

share|improve this answer
1  
You would benefit from some indexes on those tables. –  DaveShaw Mar 8 '13 at 8:12
    
@DaveShaw : Yes that is correct. –  Ravi Singh Mar 8 '13 at 8:22
    
@RaviSingh: strangely, it seems that the query plans do not match execution! See my edits -- plan expects 45%/55% ratio for RIGHT JOIN vs. FULL JOIN, but execution resulted in 99%/1%. –  agentnega Mar 8 '13 at 20:02
    
@agentnega : It can be worktable. Just to test this can you use CTE for query. I understand you have used same sub-query twice. Take that in CTE. Also, try storing that in temp table and check the performance. It can help. –  Ravi Singh Mar 9 '13 at 7:53
    
@RaviSingh, RIGHT JOIN with CTE: 37 sec; with temp table: 1.2 sec. So temp table (or table variable) fixes it but CTE does not. So it seems that the optimizer is using a temp table internally for the FULL JOIN but not with a RIGHT JOIN, resulting in terrible performance for the latter. –  agentnega Mar 11 '13 at 18:09

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