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I have

a = ["a", "d", "c", "b", "b", "c", "c"]

and need to print something like (sorted descending by number of occurrances):

c:3
b:2

I understand first part (finding NON-unique) is:

b = a.select{ |e| a.count(e) > 1 }
=> ["c", "b", "b", "c", "c"] 

or

puts b.select{|e, c| [e, a.count(e)] }.uniq

c
b

How to output each non-unique with number of occurrences sorted backwards?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted
puts a.uniq.
       map { | e | [a.count(e), e] }.
       select { | c, _ | c > 1 }.
       sort.reverse.
       map { | c, e | "#{e}:#{c}" }
share|improve this answer
    
Very elegant! What does the '_' represent? I've not seen that before. –  Richard Brown Mar 8 '13 at 0:08
3  
@RichardBrown: A variable name that usually means unused. –  Linuxios Mar 8 '13 at 0:08
    
Wow! Thank you! –  earlyadopter Mar 8 '13 at 0:12
    
You can also use underscores before unused variable names like _temporary. It serves the same purpose, but is a little more descriptive. –  Ryan Clark Mar 8 '13 at 0:51
1  
I know _ also serves a special purpose, but in this instance, where it was used as an assigned but unused variable and in order to suppress the warning ruby generates in this instance, both options serve the same purpose I believe. –  Ryan Clark Mar 8 '13 at 1:15

I personally like this solution:

 a.inject({}) {|hash, val| hash[val] ||= 0; hash[val] += 1; hash}.
   reject{|key, value| value == 1}.sort.reverse.
   each_pair{|k,v| puts("#{k}:#{v}")}
share|improve this answer
puts a.uniq.
     map { |e| a.count(e) > 1 ? [e, a.count(e)] : nil }.compact.
     sort { |a, b| b.last <=> a.last }
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a & a.uniq is the same as a. –  undur_gongor Mar 8 '13 at 0:22
1  
@undur_gongor I don't think it is, but it's the same as just having a.uniq... Any way, I kept uniq values as well in my code which makes it bad for the question and I fixed it. –  oldergod Mar 8 '13 at 0:32

How about:

a.sort.chunk{|x| a.count(x)}.sort.reverse.each do |n, v|
  puts "#{v[0]}:#{n}" if n > 1
end
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This will give you a hash with element => occurrences:

b.reduce(Hash.new(0)) do |hash, element|
  hash[element] += 1
  hash
end
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1  
The block could be put a little bit more elegantly: hash.update(element => hash[element] + 1) –  undur_gongor Mar 8 '13 at 0:24

The group_by method is used for this often:

a.group_by{ |i| i }
{
    "a" => [
        [0] "a"
    ],
    "d" => [
        [0] "d"
    ],
    "c" => [
        [0] "c",
        [1] "c",
        [2] "c"
    ],
    "b" => [
        [0] "b",
        [1] "b"
    ]
}

I like:

a.group_by{ |i| i }.each_with_object({}) { |(k,v), h| h[k] = v.size }
{
    "a" => 1,
    "d" => 1,
    "c" => 3,
    "b" => 2
}

Or:

Hash[a.group_by{ |i| i }.map{ |k,v| [k, v.size] }]
{
    "a" => 1,
    "d" => 1,
    "c" => 3,
    "b" => 2
}

One of those might scratch your itch. From there you can reduce the result using a little test:

Hash[a.group_by{ |i| i }.map{ |k,v| v.size > 1 && [k, v.size] }]
{
    "c" => 3,
    "b" => 2
}

If you just want to print the information use:

puts a.group_by{ |i| i }.map{ |k,v| "#{k}: #{v.size}" }
a: 1
d: 1
c: 3
b: 2
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a.reduce(Hash.new(0)) { |memo,x| memo[x] += 1; memo } # Frequency count.
  .select { |_,count| count > 1 } # Choose non-unique items.
  .sort_by { |x| -x[1] } # Sort by number of occurrences descending.
# => [["c", 3], ["b", 2]]

Also:

a.group_by{|x|x}.map{|k,v|[k,v.size]}.select{|x|x[1]>1}.sort_by{|x|-x[1]}
# => [["c", 3], ["b", 2]]
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