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A quick performance/memory question:

What is better, if there even is a difference?

This

int x;
for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
{
 x = i;
 //do something
}

or this

for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
{
 int x = i;
 //do something
}

?

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marked as duplicate by meriton, Louis Wasserman, barrowc, Neolisk, Perception Mar 8 '13 at 3:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Did you try it? There's almost certainly no difference. –  Carl Norum Mar 8 '13 at 0:04
    
@CarlNorum: Primitives, sure. Heavyweight objects? Less so. –  Makoto Mar 8 '13 at 0:05
    
If there was a difference, it would be negligible. So prefer the second one, which limits the scope of x. Tune your IO and your algorithms. Micro-optimizations like that won't have any significant impact on performance, but will have one on code readability and robustness. –  JB Nizet Mar 8 '13 at 0:05
5  
@Makoto if you look at the second answer of the link I provided you'll see the byte codes are exactly the same - no difference what so ever. –  Pescis Mar 8 '13 at 0:06
1  
Any possible difference in efficiency would be so minor that if it matters you probably shouldn't be using Java in the first place. –  mkataja Mar 8 '13 at 0:08
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2 Answers

I think they will both be the same in terms of assembly (its faster to just do a large stack push than a bunch of push pops for local variables sometimes). It will just reduce the scope of x in the second case even if they both produce the same bytecode.

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How could it produce the same byte code but limit the scope? –  Jason Sperske Mar 8 '13 at 0:08
    
Compilers are smart - if they see you don't use it after the loop - they'll limit the scope for you. –  Pescis Mar 8 '13 at 0:14
    
@JasonSperske The variable is just an offset in the stack. It limits the scope by forgetting the variable exists outside the loop. –  Jesus Ramos Mar 8 '13 at 1:11
    
@JasonSperske In compilers there exists environments and the concept of pushing and popping environments. Inside the loop there exists something which binds to 'x' the stack offset. Outside of it x is unknown because the environment that contained it was popped. –  Jesus Ramos Mar 8 '13 at 5:55
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It is exactly the same... defining a variable (primitive / reference) is just calculating the position where it will live (as an offset of the stack pointer). That is done by the compiler.

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