Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am writing a for loop with multiple if statements.

Is it possible that if the if statement (or one part of it) in the for statement evaluates to false, then the loop does not exit but the integer to iterates increments by one and continues through the loop (I need functionality like the continue; keyword).

Example:

for (int i = 0; i <= Collection.Count && Collection[i].Name != "Alan"; i++)
{
    // If name is not Alan, increment i and continue the loop.
}

Is this possible?

Thanks

share|improve this question
3  
Example code would be a big help. I have no idea what you mean about "if statements evaluating to false", if that happens then the stuff inside that doesn't get executed and the loop continues as normal. –  DisgruntledGoat Oct 6 '09 at 22:37
    
Provide example code. –  abelenky Oct 6 '09 at 22:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You need functionality like the continue keyword - have you considered using the continue keyword, then?

Update: Your example code is hard to decipher the intention of.

for (int i = 0; i <= Collection.Count && Collection[i].Name != "Alan"; i++)
{
    // If name is not Alan, increment i.
}

The for loop has three parts to it, separated by two semi-colons. The first part initializes the loop variable(s). The second part is an expression that is evaluated each time an iteration is about to start; if it is false, the loop terminates. The third part executes after each iteration.

So your loop above will exit at the first "Alan" it encounters, and also it will increment i every time it finishes an iteration. Finally, if there are no Alans, it will execute the last time with i equal to Collection.Count, which is one larger than the maximum valid index into the collection. So it will throw an exception for sure, as you try to access Collection[i] when i is out of range.

Maybe you want this:

foreach (var item in Collection.Where(i => i.Name != "Alan"))
{
    // item is not an "Alan"
}

You can think of the Where extension method as a way of filtering a collection.

If this seems obscure, you can achieve the same thing with the continue keyword (as you guessed):

foreach (var item in Collection)
{
    if (item.Name == "Alan")
        continue;

    // item is not an "Alan"
}

Or you can just put the code in the if's block:

foreach (var item in Collection)
{
    if (item.Name != "Alan")
    {
        // item is not an "Alan"
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation. I'm aware of the Where() method but just thought it was feasible to go about things as above but I guess that's not the right way! Thanks. –  dotnetdev Oct 6 '09 at 22:58

Do you mean like this?

for (int i = 0; i < 100; ) {
    if (!condition1) {
        i++;
    }
    if (!condition2) {
        i++;
    }
    if (!condition3) {
        i++;
    }
}

Do you want the incrementor for finishing the for loop to be in the body of the loop?

share|improve this answer

I am not sure I understand correctly. You have a for loop something like this

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    // do something
    if (!b1)
      i++

    // do something
}

Edit:

If you use continue it increments i for only once. If you use i++ in loop it increments twice obviously. If you only want to icrement on a condition, Use the for loop like this

for (int i = 0; i < 10) // and this is very similar to a while loop.

share|improve this answer

From your sample code, I think you are searching for the name "Alan". Is this correct?

If so, structure your loop like:

for (int i = 0; i < Collection.Count; i++)
{
    if (Collection[i].Name == "Alan")
    {
        break;  // We found the name we wanted!
    }

    // Otherwise: Keep going to look for the name further on.
}

if (i == Collection.Count)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Alan is not found");
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("Alan found at position {0}", i);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.