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I'm trying to invert an array, with the below-shown code, with no sucess. The output of the program is 7,0,0 and not 7,1,2 as its supposed to be.

Code:

import java.util.Arrays;

public class ReverseArray
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int[] data = {1, 2, 7};
        int[] dataR = reverseArray(data);
        System.out.println("Original Array: " + Arrays.toString(data));
        System.out.println("Reverse Array: " +  Arrays.toString(dataR));
    }
    public static int[] reverseArray(int[] data)
    {
        int[] reversedData = new int[data.length];
        int i;
        for(i=0; i < data.length; i++);
        {
            reversedData[i] = data[(data.length - i -1)];
        }
        return reversedData;
    }
}

All help appreciated, thanks.

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4  
Are you required to do it by hand? Can you use something like Collections.reverse(Collections.toArray(data)).toArray(new int[data.length]) ? –  MadProgrammer Mar 8 '13 at 0:26
    
@BheshGurung I did say "something like" :P - trying to ascertain if it was homework or not ;) –  MadProgrammer Mar 8 '13 at 0:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is your problem:

for(i=0; i < data.length; i++);

Delete the ; . The way you wrote it, first there's a loop that counts i up to data.length, then a scoped block that tries to access reversedData[data.length] exactly once. That won't fly.

Funny thing: originally, probably none of us saw what the problem is; using formatting rules in an IDE will tell you pretty quickly what's wrong: you'll see that your code doesn't look like it's supposed to when formatted according to rules you're used to.

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It also needs to stop half way to data.length or it reverses the array then unreverses it :P –  Patashu Mar 8 '13 at 0:31
    
@Patashu: No, it is building a new array, not swapping. –  nneonneo Mar 8 '13 at 0:32
    
Ah, my mistake for skimming :) –  Patashu Mar 8 '13 at 0:32

You should use temporary variable to swap values in array. For example like this:

for(int i = 0; i < validData.length / 2; i++)
{
    int temp = validData[i];
    validData[i] = validData[validData.length - i - 1];
    validData[validData.length - i - 1] = temp;
}

or

ArrayUtils.reverse(int[] array)

All described in this question.

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Ehem, he isn't swapping anything, he's building a brand new array. –  nneonneo Mar 8 '13 at 0:31

Good catch, G. Bach. I'm also not sure about the first part of your question. It looks like the original array is 1, 2, 7. Wouldn't the reverse of that be 7, 2, 1 and NOT 7, 1, 2?

That said, it seems like you might be slowing things down by accessing data.length every time. I'd probably create a local variable thusly:

public static int[] reverseArray(int[] data)
{
    int arr_length = data.length
    int[] reversedData = new int[arr_length];
    int j = arr_length - 1;
    for(int i=0; i < arr_length; i++);
    {
        reversedData[i] = data[j--];
    }
    return reversedData;
}

Notice how j is automatically decremented after it's been accessed, keeping things nice and tidy. Also, we've saved the length of the array into a local variable so it's more efficient to access.

share|improve this answer
    
Just let the JVM's JIT handle it. ('sides, you're still accessing data.length each time in the i < data.length). –  nneonneo Mar 8 '13 at 1:11
    
Oh yeah, because the length could have changed during the body of the loop, and so it would have to check. Good point. ^^; –  Onikoroshi Mar 11 '13 at 15:25

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