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I am getting the following while linking:

BServer.cpp:(.text+0x58e5): undefined reference to `dbusServer::dbusServer(char*, int)'
BServer.cpp:(.text+0x58f4): undefined reference to `dbusServer::~dbusServer()'

The g++ output when running make is:

g++ dbusServer.o PCounter.o BServer.o -o PCounter -L./BAPI/lib -L./usr/local/lib/libdbus -lBAPIx64 -m64 -lstdc++ -lpthread -lboost_system -lboost_program_options -L./home/ben/Downloads/libdbus-3.0.3/src/ -ldbus -L/home/ben/workspace/IntegratedPCounter/src/PCounter

I am including from /home/ben/workspace/IntegratedPCounter/src/PCounter as '#include "dbusServer.h' in BServer.cpp

I then try to create an instance of dbusServer in BServer, like this:

dbusServer modserver("192.168.0.9",5432);

Here is the header file for dbus:

// Define the number of devices to be managed
#include <dbus.h>
#define ADDRESS_START    0
#define ADDRESS_END      7

#ifndef dbusSERVER_H_
#define dbusSERVER_H_

class dbusServer {
dbus_t *ctx;
int nb;
typedef struct regHL
{
    uint16_t hibits;
    uint16_t lowbits;
};
private:
    void SplitCount(int); //To-do determine of the value needs to be split
    void addDevice(int);

public:
    dbusServer(char *, int);

    ~dbusServer();

    int WriteDeviceCounts(int, int);
    int AddDevice(int);
    int resetDeviceCounts(int);
 };
 #endif /* dbusSERVER_H_ *

Here is the dbus code:

#include <dbus.h>;
#include <errno.h>
#include "dbusServer.h"
//Using boost program options to read command line and config file data
#include <boost/program_options.hpp>
#include <syslog.h>
using namespace std;

namespace po = boost::program_options;
//alias program option namespace


    int nb = 0;
    dbus_t *ctx;
    int rc;
    int dbusServer::dbusServer(char *IPAddress, int port) {
        nb = 0;
        // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
        int socket;
        ctx = dbus_new_tcp(IPAddress, port);
        dbus_mapping_t *mb_mapping;
    mb_mapping = dbus_mapping_new(500, 500, 500, 500);
    if (mb_mapping == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Failed to allocate the mapping: %s\n",
                dbus_strerror(errno));
        dbus_free(ctx);
        return (-1);
    }

    socket = dbus_tcp_listen(ctx, 1);
    dbus_tcp_accept(ctx, &socket);

    return (0);
}

dbusServer::~dbusServer() {
    // TODO Auto-generated destructor stub
    dbus_mapping_free (mb_mapping);
    dbus_close(ctx);
    dbus_free(ctx);
}

int writeDeviceCounts(uint32_t counts, int device) {
    //split the 32 bit value from the counting device
    uint16_t highBits = (counts & 0xFFFFFFFF00000000) >> 16; // get the high bits
    uint16_t lowBits = (counts & 0xFFFFFFFF); //get the low bits

    return (-1);
}


int addDevice(int device_id) {
    //increment the device counter
    return(-1);

}

void removeDevice(int device_id) {

}



void resetDeviceCounts(int device_id) {

}

In the book "Safe C++" (Kushnir, V.,O'Reilly Press, 2012) on p.58, there is an example of bad class creation, especially in regards to coding a descructor. However, the corrected implementation looks like it would solve some of my problems.

One thing I am wondering is how to avoid problems with implementing a class in c++ so these things don't come up. There must be a list of do's and don'ts in the common vernacular that can steer one away from issues.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Kay, Steven Penny, sgarizvi, bipen, Raptor Mar 8 '13 at 7:10

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dbusServer(char *, int); ~dbusServer(); - these are your declarations, do you have a similar implementation in the dbusServer.cpp file? –  Joe Mar 8 '13 at 1:20
    
Lose the semi-colon after #include <dbus.h>;. Also, since dbusServer.h include dbus.h itself, it is not clear that you need the #include <dbus.h> line in the .cpp at all. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 8 '13 at 2:45
    
Your code is all over the place: 1. The comment after the #endif in your header is not terminated (a copy-paste error?). 2. Your code is not properly indented, making it hard to read. 3. What are those global variables nb, ctx and rc doing in your source .cpp file, just before the constructor? 4. A constructor doesn't return anything, remove the int in front of it and the return! 5. The functions writeDeviceCounts, addDevice and removeDevice need dbusServer:: to be prefixed. 6. Your spelling of the function names between the header and the source file is inconsistent. –  Michael Wild Mar 8 '13 at 7:21
    
3)The global variables were originally in the constructor, but when the destructor is called to dispose of the data, the compiler would complain that the variables were not in scope. 4) I will remove the return in the constructor. Hopefully cleaning up the scrambled code will reveal more about the error. -> Jonathan I think has it figured out...I do not need to include dbus.h since dbusServer.h already has the include; this is confusing me and the compiler. –  bentaisan Mar 8 '13 at 13:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your dbusServer.cpp is problematic. remove the lines like class dbusServer {, it makes your dbusServer(...) to be referenced as dbusServer::dbusServer::dbusServer(...).

extract your member functions codes from the class definition in .cpp file.

in summary, a class declared in *.h as

class dbusServer{
    dbsusServer(char*, int);
    ...
};

its implementation in *.cpp should be

dbusServer::dbusServer(char*, int){
...
}

instead of :

class dbusServer{
     dbusServer::dbusServer(char*, int){
      ...
     }
};

In addition, the constructor is not right.

int dbusServer::dbusServer(char *IPAddress, int port) {

it should be:

dbusServer::dbusServer(char *IPAddress, int port) {
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I did that ane issues a 'make clean' and I still get : BServer.cpp:(.text+0x58e5): undefined reference to `dbusServer::dbusServer(char*, int)' –  bentaisan Mar 8 '13 at 3:23
    
Ok, I still am getting the error. –  bentaisan Mar 8 '13 at 3:51
    
the constructor is not well defined. –  raison Mar 8 '13 at 7:02
undefined reference to dbusServer::dbusServer(char*, int)
undefined reference to dbusServer::~dbusServer()'

Those errors mean that you told the compiler these functions exist...

class dbusServer {
    dbusServer(char *, int);
    ~dbusServer();
};

...and the compiler decided to use them.

But you never wrote them. They're undefined.

Edit:

In one of your source files, you need to have:

dbusServer::dbusServer(char *, int)
{
    // Your code
}

dbusServer::~dbusServer()
{
    // Your code
}
share|improve this answer
    
The methods definitely exist in dbsServer.cpp, so that isn't it. In the cpp file, though, I had dbus::dbusServer and dbus::~dbusServer and it said that I had a double reference, so I took out dbus:: –  bentaisan Mar 8 '13 at 1:06
    
@bentaisan Please add that code to your question. –  Drew Dormann Mar 8 '13 at 1:08

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