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Is there a way of making map lazy? Or is there another implementation of it built-in in Python?

I want something like this to work:

from itertools import count

for x in map(lambda x: x**2, count()):
    print x

Of course, the above code won't end, but I'd like just to enter any condition (or more complex logic) inside the for and stop at some point.

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1  
See here: Know when to be Lazy. In short: either use generator expressions or use the itertools module. – Robert Harvey Mar 8 '13 at 1:24
    
@RobertHarvey: Nice link. In fact, other than doing x*2 instead of x**2, the blog is pretty much perfectly tailored to this question! – abarnert Mar 8 '13 at 1:27
    
@RobertHarvey Very nice article. Thank you! – Oscar Mederos Mar 8 '13 at 1:32
up vote 24 down vote accepted

use itertools.imap on Python 2.x or upgrade to Python 3.x

You can also just use a simple generator expression that is far more pythonic:

foo = (x**2 for x in count())
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5  
+1 for recommending the generator expression. Wherever you need lambda, map() isn't a good choice. – Gareth Latty Mar 8 '13 at 1:36
    
Thanks for your reply. I just tried to make a simpler code sample for the question (when using map). – Oscar Mederos Mar 8 '13 at 1:38

itetools.imap is lazy.

In [3]: itertools.imap?
Type:       type
String Form:<type 'itertools.imap'>
Docstring:
imap(func, *iterables) --> imap object

Make an iterator that computes the function using arguments from
each of the iterables.  Like map() except that it returns
an iterator instead of a list and that it stops when the shortest
iterable is exhausted instead of filling in None for shorter
iterables.
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