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I have a dataflow inside a dtsx package that processes all of the data that I need to process. At the end, I need to perform some clean up tasks. For example, assume the following stucture:

What I'd like to do

If a record is true for all 3 cases then I want to run all three OLE DB Commands. If the record is true for only case 1 then it should only run case 1.

I could do this with a multicast and 3 seperate conditional splits (as per below), but I was hoping for a cleaner way. Any ideas?

Possible alternative. Is there a better way?

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Using a multicast and three conditional splits is the easiest to implement, and is also probably the most easily understood.

A Script Component set up as a Transformation with three outputs is probably the next easiest to implement - but it will involve a bunch of setup and some level of coding. The data flow will look relatively pretty:

enter image description here

For each output, make sure to set the Synchronous Input ID to None (so that you can control when rows are created); then you'll need to duplicate each of the input columns in each output. The script code itself will look like this:

public override void IncomingRows_ProcessInputRow(IncomingRowsBuffer Row)
{
    if (Case1Logic(Row))
    {
        Case1OutputBuffer.AddRow();
        Case1OutputBuffer.ProductId = Row.ProductID;
        Case1OutputBuffer.Name = Row.Name;
        // etc. for all columns
    }
    if (Case2Logic(Row))
    {
        Case2OutputBuffer.AddRow();
        Case2OutputBuffer.ProductId = Row.ProductID;
        Case2OutputBuffer.Name = Row.Name;
        // etc. for all columns
    }
    if (Case3Logic(Row))
    {
        Case3OutputBuffer.AddRow();
        Case3OutputBuffer.ProductId = Row.ProductID;
        Case3OutputBuffer.Name = Row.Name;
        // etc. for all columns
    }
}

private bool Case1Logic(IncomingRowsBuffer Row)
{
    // Whatever the Case 1 logic involves
}
private bool Case2Logic(IncomingRowsBuffer Row)
{
    // Whatever the Case 2 logic involves
}
private bool Case3Logic(IncomingRowsBuffer Row)
{
    // Whatever the Case 3 logic involves
} 

Have fun keeping this up to date when people decide they want to change the columns!

If that's not hairy enough for you, you could write your own custom transformation. The gory details on how to do that are in MSDN; suffice it to say that there will be a lot more code involved. You'll also learn more than you maybe ever wanted to about how SSIS handles buffer management, which may in turn explain why the out-of-the-box Conditional Split doesn't let you send the same row to more than one output.

Finally, if you want a truly ugly-looking solution that will also be a maintenance nightmare, try building a Conditional Split with one output for each combination of cases. Put a Union All tranformation in front of each of your OLE destinations. Direct the Cases 1, 2 and 3 output to a three-way Multicast, with one multicast output going to each of the three Union All transformations. The Cases 1 and 2, Cases 2 and 3 and Cases 1 and 3 outputs of the Conditional Split would each go to two-way Multicast transformations (which would in turn feed the appropriate Union All), while the Case 1, Case 2 and Case 3 outputs would go directly to the appropriate Union All. It would look something like this:

enter image description here

In summary, I think your original idea is the simplest and probably best.

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1  
Wow. thanks for all the effort and details. I think I will stick with my original. –  Greg Mar 8 '13 at 4:49
    
I think that's the best choice, unless you really want to get into nitty-gritty programming. (Which, sometimes, some of us really like to do ...) Glad to have helped! –  Edmund Schweppe Mar 8 '13 at 16:10
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Depending on how comfortable you are with C# or VB, you could write your own transform that is essentially the multicast and conditional split in one. Add a script component onto the data flow and it'll ask you whether it's a source, transform, or destination. Choose transform, add your input and three outputs and go from there. Good luck!

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I guess that would work. Seems like a bit of effort just to keep it neat. I was hoping for something built in... –  Greg Mar 8 '13 at 3:47
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