Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to bin continuous data into an arbitrary number of quantiles. However, my application needs the maximum value of quantile bin returned:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

In [1]: s = pd.Series(np.random.randint(0,20,20)); s[:5]
Out[1]:
0     0
1    15
2     5
3    19
4    15

Let's say I create 5 quantiles using pandas.qcut:

In [2]: bins = pd.qcut(s,5); bins
Out[2]:
Categorical:
array([[0, 1.8], (9.8, 15.2], (1.8, 6.2], (15.2, 19], (9.8, 15.2],
       (1.8, 6.2], (6.2, 9.8], (6.2, 9.8], (15.2, 19], (9.8, 15.2],
       [0, 1.8], (6.2, 9.8], (1.8, 6.2], [0, 1.8], (9.8, 15.2], [0, 1.8],
       (15.2, 19], (15.2, 19], (6.2, 9.8], (1.8, 6.2]], dtype=object)
Levels (5): Index([[0, 1.8], (1.8, 6.2], (6.2, 9.8], (9.8, 15.2],
                   (15.2, 19]], dtype=object)

With bin labels:

In [3]: bins.labels
Out[3]: array([0, 3, 1, 4, 3, 1, 2, 2, 4, 3, 0, 2, 1, 0, 3, 0, 4, 4, 2, 1])

Rather than return the number of the quantile, is there a way I can return the upper bin edge that each value belongs to? Here's an example of my desired output:

    original  bin_max
0          0        1
1         15       15
2          5        5
3         19       19
4         15       15
5          2        5
6          7        9
7          7        9
8         16       19
9         12       15
10         0        1
11         8        9
12         5        5
13         1        1
14        11       15
15         1        1
16        18       19
17        16       19
18         9        9
19         3        5

This is the solution I'm currently using, but it seems inefficient to groupby the qcut when the value I need is already found in the qcut labels:

In [4]: s.groupby(pd.qcut(s,5)).transform(max)
Out[4]:
0      1
1     15
2      5
3     19
4     15
5      5
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use retbins=True to get the edges of the bin as a numpy array:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

np.random.seed(1)
s = pd.Series(np.random.randint(0,20,20))

categories, edges = pd.qcut(s, 5, retbins=True)
df = pd.DataFrame({'original':s,
                   'bin_max': edges[1:][categories.labels]},
                  columns = ['original', 'bin_max'])
print(df)

yields

    original  bin_max
0          5      5.0
1         11     11.0
2         12     13.4
3          8      8.6
4          9     11.0
5         11     11.0
6          5      5.0
7         15     18.0
8          0      5.0
9         16     18.0
10         1      5.0
11        12     13.4
12         7      8.6
13        13     13.4
14         6      8.6
15        18     18.0
16         5      5.0
17        18     18.0
18        11     11.0
19        10     11.0
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! I played around with retbins but didn't think to unpack it. This solution will work nicely. – Zelazny7 Mar 8 '13 at 3:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.