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I know that it's possible to add to the prototype of a function such that

function main(){}
main.prototype.load = function()
{

}
...

and run the function called main.load.

Is it possible to make a prototype of a function within that prototype? In other words, can I do something like this:

main.prototype.get = function(){}
main.prototype.get.prototype.registration = function()
{
    // load registration info
}

and call the function using main.get.registration();?

When I try to do this, I am given this error message in the console:

Uncaught TypeError: Object function (){} has no method 'registration'

EDIT: I am doing this after calling new main();. So I would be doing something like

var thisMain = new main();
thisMain.get.registration();
share|improve this question
    
What if you try? –  zerkms Mar 8 '13 at 3:14
1  
It should be possible but it doesn't seem like a good idea. If this is already confusing in JS with one prototype, imagine with two... –  elclanrs Mar 8 '13 at 3:14
1  
First, you don't have access to load or get directly from main. You would have access from its .prototype, or from an instance created by invoking main with new. Second, You can put .get on main.prototype, but there'll be no special relationship between instance from get and instances from main. –  the system Mar 8 '13 at 3:19
    
why do you want to do it? –  Arun P Johny Mar 8 '13 at 3:27
    
I want to do it so that it looks nice when someone is looking at the code. I think main.get.registration() looks nicer than main.prototype.get.prototype.registration() –  Joshua Smock Mar 8 '13 at 3:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you misunderstand prototypes a bit.

Given a function Foo, Foo.prototype is not the prototype of the Foo object. It is the prototype that will be assigned to objects created using new Foo(). For example:

// This is a constructor that creates objects whose prototype is Person.prototype
var Person = function(name) {
    this.name = name;
}
Person.prototype.sayHello = function() {
    console.log("Hello, my name is " + this.name);
}
var drew = new Person('Drew');
drew.sayHello();  // <-- Logs a message
drew.__proto__;   // <-- Not part of the Javascript spec, but it some browsers this is a reference to Person.prototype

Your main.get.registration could be implemented without prototypes:

main = function() {/* do stuff*/}
main.get = function() {/* this is a getter function? */}
main.get.registration = function() {/* I don't know what this does */}

What kind of interface or API are you hoping to create? Does it involve creating objects using new?

UPDATE: Here's one of many possible ways to implement what you want:

main = function() {
    // store a reference to this instance.
    var self = this;
    // Construct the get object.  It doesn't need to be a function because it's never invoked
    this.get = {};
    this.get.registration = function() {
        // Use self to refer to the specific instance of main you're interacting with.
        retrieveRegistrationFor(self); // <-- pseudo-code
    }
}

UPDATE 2: Here's how to construct the get object using a constructor, allowing you to use prototypes for everything. I've capitalized the names of your constructors, which is a best practice that helps to differentiate between normal functions/methods and constructors.

// Constructor for the get object.  This is only ever invoked in Main's constructor.
Getter = function(mainInstance) {
    this.self = mainInstance;
}
Getter.prototype.registration = function() {
    retrieveRegistrationFor(this.self); // <-- pseudo-code
}

Main = function() {
    // Construct the get object and attach it to this object.
    this.get = new Getter(this);
}

As the other answers have pointed out, there are lots of ways to construct objects in Javascript. It all depends on the situation and your personal coding style.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I need to explain a little better in my answer, but yes it involves using new. I would be doing something like var thisMain = new main(); thisMain.get.registration(); This is what I currently do, but when I attempt to do this, it spits out the error stated in the question. –  Joshua Smock Mar 8 '13 at 3:27
    
Did you mean to say var thisMain = new main(); thisMain.get.registration()? Also, when do you invoke the get function? If you never do, then get can be a plain object rather than a function. –  cspotcode Mar 8 '13 at 3:29
    
I did mean thisMain.get.registration(), but I caught it after the fact. I never directly invoke the get function, just main, which might be my issue. –  Joshua Smock Mar 8 '13 at 3:30
    
Ok, because your .registration function must have a reference to thisMain, get will have to be initialized in the main constructor. I'll update my answer with details. –  cspotcode Mar 8 '13 at 3:32
    
Thanks for the answer! I think that is what I'm looking for. As a theoretical question, is it possible to implement using only prototypes, such as my original idea? I like the aesthetic of main.prototype.get = function(){}; main.prototype.get.prototype.registration = function(){...} but if it's not possible or very complicated to implement then it's probably not worth it for what I'm doing. –  Joshua Smock Mar 8 '13 at 3:45

I did get it to work with

main.prototype.get.prototype.registration();

But remember, as @the_system mentioned, that you can't use main.get directly; you have to go through the prototype to find the get function (and similarity with the registration function).

share|improve this answer

This is just my personal opinion, but I've always found the protypical inheritance model in JavaScript hard to grok. It's difficult to reason with when writing the code, and it's more difficult to reason with maintaining the code 6 months later.

However, what I think you're asking is really just this: "Can I write a class which inherits methods on its members from an anonymous class?" When you rephrase it this way, I think it becomes clear that there is uncertain value in the approach. The whole purpose of writing classes is to support simple abstraction and encapsulation while keeping composition tight.

It would be more straightforward to use a tradition Object, ala:

var main = { 
    get: {
        registration: function() {
            //TODO
        }  
    }
}

and main.get.registration() is simple as pie. If you can leverage Object.create() and Object.defineProperties() to do this, all the better.

If you absolutely have to use prototypical inheritance, I like the simple Function.prototype extension that Mr. Kistner proposes:

Function.prototype.inheritsFrom = function(parentClassOrObject) {
    if (parentClassOrObject.constructor === Function) {
        //Normal Inheritance
        this.prototype = new parentClassOrObject;
        this.prototype.constructor = this;
        this.prototype.parent = parentClassOrObject.prototype;
    } else {
        //Pure Virtual Inheritance
        this.prototype = parentClassOrObject;
        this.prototype.constructor = this;
        this.prototype.parent = parentClassOrObject;
    }
    return this;
};

This allows you to then compose classes and inheritance like so:

/***
 * Method to create a Class with optional inheritance.
 * Generally, I oppose this semantic in JS:
 * partly because of the ineffability of the 'this' operator,
 * and partly because of the difficulty in grokking this.
 * What we're really saying here (through the wonders of functional programming) is this:
 *
 *      var MyClass1 = function(param1) {
 *          var ret = this;
 *          ret.id = param1;
 *          return ret;
 *      };
 *
 *      var MyClass2 = function(param1, param2) {
 *          var ret = this;
 *          MyClass1.apply(this, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0));
 *          ret.name = param2;
 *          return ret;
 *      };
 *
 *      MyClass2.prototype = new MyClass1;
 *      MyClass2.prototype.constructor = MyClass1;
 *      MyClass2.prototype.parent = MyClass1.prototype;
 *
 * I find this whole mode of operation as dull as it is stupid.
 * Nonetheless, there are occasions when the convention is suitable for type/instance checking
 *
 * Obviously, this method has very little utility if you are not using prototypal inheritance
*/
var MyClassCreatorMethod = function(name, inheritsFrom, callBack) {
    var obj = Object.create(null);
    obj[name] = function() {
        try {
            if(inheritsFrom ) {
                inheritsFrom.apply(this, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0));
            }
            callBack.apply(this, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0));
        } catch(e) {
            //do something
        }
    };
    if(inheritsFrom) {
        obj[name].inheritsFrom(inheritsFrom);
    }
    return obj[name];
};

From here, it becomes trivial to daisy-chain inherited classes. I just pulled this out of one of my projects, so not all of the semantics of this apply to you--it's just to illustrate a way to functionalize the behavior in a way that's easier to reason with.

share|improve this answer

Perhaps what you want to do is this:

function main(){}
main.prototype.load = function()
{

};

main.prototype.get = function(){};
main.prototype.get.prototype.registration = function()
{
    // load registration info
    alert('hi, I\'m working');
};

var thisMain = new main();
var other = new thisMain.get();
other.registration();
share|improve this answer
    
Try it here jsfiddle.net/8He4E –  eburgos Mar 8 '13 at 3:41

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