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Which would be considered more proper technique for implementing a try/catch in Java:

A:

Date lastMod = null;
BufferedReader inFile = null;
    try {
        inFile = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("C:\\Java\\settings.ini"));
        try {
            lastMod = new Date(Long.parseLong(inFile.readLine()));
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    } catch(FileNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

or B:

Date lastMod = null;
BufferedReader inFile = null;
    try {
        inFile = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("C:\\Java\\settings.ini"));
        lastMod = new Date(Long.parseLong(inFile.readLine()));
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

Also, is it wrong to follow the try/catch block with a long block of code that makes use of the BufferedReader, or is it preferred to include the long block of code inside the try/catch?

For example:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Date lastMod = null;
    BufferedReader inFile = null;
    try {
        inFile = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("C:\\Java\\settings.ini"));
        lastMod = new Date(Long.parseLong(inFile.readLine()));
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    //Long block of code using inFile
    inFile.readLine();
    inFile.close();

Versus:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Date lastMod = null;
    BufferedReader inFile = null;
    try {
        inFile = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("C:\\Java\\settings.ini"));
        lastMod = new Date(Long.parseLong(inFile.readLine()));
        //Long block of code using inFile
        inFile.readLine();
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        inFile.close();
    }
share|improve this question
3  
B. It's more concise and readable.... – Thihara Mar 8 '13 at 4:21
2  
Have you heard or tried try-with-resource ? – Abubakkar Rangara Mar 8 '13 at 4:23
    
Both cases, option B! – R.J Mar 8 '13 at 4:23
    
Following case B (In both places) is always would be preferable & coneventional. – Web_developer Mar 8 '13 at 4:25

B is much more readable, when there is nothing going on after the internal try block, before the external try block. If you have logic to perform in between, then you must use A

In the second example the second version using finally is critical to ensure that close will be called no matter what (even if the function returns first) The first version without finally is actually wrong, since you may use up all the file handles and be unable to open more files.

As an additional note, you may need to check for null when calling close. And if you are using java 7, it's even better to use "try with resources".

share|improve this answer

For the first question: the solution A add unnecessary complexity. Use B or, if you are using Java 7, try-with-resources:

    Date lastMod = null;
    try (BufferedReader inFile = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("C:\\Java\\settings.ini"))){
        lastMod = new Date(Long.parseLong(inFile.readLine()));
    } catch (FileNotFoundException | IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

For the second question: in the first version, what if the BufferedReader creation throws an exception? You would use brafter which is null and would throw a NullPointerException. Also if something else happen, you will not have called inFile.close(), so you really need a finally. For all these reasons, again, the second solution is better.

If you are using try-with-resouces (Java 7), of course, you don't need a finally block to release your BufferedReader.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answers. I hadnt heard of a try-with-resources but Ill do some reading. – korshyadoo Mar 8 '13 at 4:32

Proper technique might also include not catching your exceptions, but allowing them to bubble up to a caller instead. Do always use a finally block to clean up any state that might otherwise use up resources, but you'll often be better off catching the exception in the parent routine rather than the child routine in which the exception was thrown.

In general, if it would be helpful to know in the calling routine whether the sub-routine succeeded or not, then that sub-routine should not catch its exceptions, but should allow them to bubble up to their caller.

share|improve this answer

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