Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

--full-time is a handy little option for ls but it doesn't work when used in a batch file.

ls -al --full-time when used at the command prompt yields a an expanded date and time:

2012-01-16 18:56:00.000000000

used in a bash script I got this:

ls: illegal option -- - usage: ls [-ABCFGHLOPRSTUWabcdefghiklmnopqrstuwx1] [file ...]

is there any way around this.

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by trojanfoe, martin clayton, X.L.Ant, Charles Stewart, Roman C Mar 8 '13 at 9:38

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Want to show us your script? I'm not having any problems with that command in a bash file. –  aqua Mar 8 '13 at 4:37
    
I wish I knew a way to format ls datetimes (I'd rather see ISO-8601). Apple's BSD manual for ls seems to offer nothing for formatting datetimes, other than changing timezone and sorting by datetime rather than alpha. developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Darwin/Reference/… –  janaspage Aug 12 '14 at 5:29

3 Answers 3

for native ls command, option -T seems to be the alternative of --full-time, and it expands to seconds, example as below:

>$  ls -lT
-rw-r--r--   1 raison staff     197 Feb 14 09:12:56 2013 1.c
-rw-r--r--   1 raison staff    1174 Mar  8 09:34:49 2013 1.s
-rw-r--r--   1 raison staff     993 Feb  5 14:44:09 2013 1.x86.s
share|improve this answer

The BSD (Mac OS X) version of ls (installed as /usr/bin/ls) does not support the --full-time option.

The GNU version of ls does support --full-time. I have the GNU ls installed in a different directory (/usr/gnu/bin/ls).

  • Are you sure that you have GNU ls on your machine at all?
  • If so, are you sure your PATH includes the directory where it is installed ahead of /usr/bin when you run scripts?
share|improve this answer
$ uname -rs
Darwin 11.4.2
$ ls -al --full-time
ls: illegal option -- -
usage: ls [-ABCFGHLOPRSTUWabcdefghiklmnopqrstuwx1] [file ...]

Are you sure your ls isn't actually gls installed by homebrew?

share|improve this answer
    
I'm on Darwin 12.2.0 and see the same thing--the invocation never works. –  John Zwinck Mar 8 '13 at 4:37
    
Actually, I tried gls and it worked fine in a script. –  Anthony Bouttell Apr 2 '13 at 19:08

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.