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I have three function for read , write and deletion in map in multi thread environment. So Is they work fine ?or they create deadlock or any other kind of error I want to read , write and delete from map in multi thread program.

//Function for read 
string GetData (const int key)
{

    pthread_rwlock_rdlock(&rwlock); //read lock
    string result = "not found";
    my_map::const_iterator iter = m.find(key);
    if ( iter != m.end() )//found
    {
        result = iter->second;
    }
    else //missing
    {
        // change from read mode to write mode
        pthread_rwlock_unlock(&rwlock); // unlock read lock
        pthread_rwlock_wrlock(&rwlock); // write lock
        // Try again
        iter = m.find(key);
        if (iter != m.end()) {
            result = iter->second;
        }
        else
        {
        string = "";
        }
    }
    pthread_rwlock_unlock(&rwlock); // unlock read/write lock
    return result;
}

//Function for write
void SetData (const int key)
{

    pthread_rwlock_rdlock(&rwlock); //read lock
    string result = "not found";
    my_map::const_iterator iter = m.find(key);
    if ( iter != m.end() )//found
    {
        result = iter->second;
    }
    else //missing
    {
        // change from read mode to write mode
        pthread_rwlock_unlock(&rwlock); // unlock read lock
        pthread_rwlock_wrlock(&rwlock); // write lock
        // Try again
        iter = m.find(key);
        if (iter != m.end()) {
            result = iter->second;
        }
        else
        {
            m[key] = "missing data";
            result = "missing data";
        }
    }
    pthread_rwlock_unlock(&rwlock); // unlock read/write lock
    return result;
}
//Function for delete
//Function for write
void deleteData (const int key)
{
    pthread_rwlock_rdlock(&rwlock); //read lock
    string result = "not found";
    my_map::const_iterator iter = m.find(key);
    if ( iter != m.end() )//found
    {
        result = iter->second;
    }
    else //missing
    {
        // change from read mode to write mode
        pthread_rwlock_unlock(&rwlock); // unlock read lock
        pthread_rwlock_wrlock(&rwlock); // write lock
        // Try again
        iter = m.find(key);
        if (iter != m.end()) {
            my_map->erase(iter);
        }
        else
        {
        }
    }
    pthread_rwlock_unlock(&rwlock); // unlock read/write lock
    return result;
}
share|improve this question
1  
This question, and most certainly this code, belongs on codereview.stackexchange.com. Right off the top, however, this stands no chance of even compiling. Return values from void functions alone will prevent that. There are zero checks for potential failure conditions in any of the pthread locking calls. Your logic for write-locking in GetData() is twisted, and your SetData will never write anything except "missing data" to any slot (there is no value to set with the call, thereby making it near-pointless). Just preparing you for what you'll get from code review. – WhozCraig Mar 8 '13 at 5:43

Your code has few issues; so it appears to me.

  1. e.g. deleteData; if you do find the record under the read lock, what are you doing with it? Not deleting it? Same goes for your write function.
  2. Why would you take read locks in write and delete functions? Why not straight away take write locks?
  3. In read why are you taking a write lock anyways?

Pseudo code according to me should be

Read - take read lock - find. store result - found or not found. - release lock - return

Write - take write lock - write. Decide whether you would overwrite existing key or not. If not overwrite what would you return? Most standard implementations are set to overwrite. - release lock - return

Your general approach is good - no problems.

You cannot have deadlocks with only one lock. You require at least two locks and a particular pattern for deadlock to happen. e.g.

Thread 1 Lock(A) Lock(B)

Thread 2 Lock(B) Lock(A)

the above might lead to a deadlock if the thread 1 swaps out right after first lock call and thread 2 kicks in.

If you want to go more exotic than that, and worry about other potential problems, then e.g. you can worry about priority inversion. I am saying exotic because in most cases you do not even have to think about it.

share|improve this answer

It looks OK and will not create any deadlocks as long as your code has no other mutexes that interfer and does not throw exceptions.

Exception are your worst enemy when you mix C-style code with C++. I'd suggest you look into C++11's std::mutex and std::lock_guard, but you can also fix it manually, see below for a straight-forward solution. There are more elegant ways, but the vital thing is to take care of it in some way.

What about other mutexes? In your example they could hide in the type my_map if that is a user-defined type (not some standard container) and the member functions find, etc. would also lock a mutex internally. In other cases (not in your example), also the value might be a UDT and not just int and use mutexes.

One thing that is odd about your code: Why does GetData lock the mutex with a write-lock? That seems superfluous and inefficient. Also for the other functions I'd just get the write-lock immediately and skip getting a read-lock in general. But you might want to profile that one as both might be valid use-cases and both could have potential performance benefits.

Also, when working with mutexes, always move code outside of the locked section if possible. That said, here's how GetData should look like:

string GetData (const int key)
{
  string result = "not found"; // moved before the lock
  pthread_rwlock_rdlock(&rwlock); //read lock
  try {
    my_map::const_iterator iter = m.find(key);
    if ( iter != m.end() )//found
    {
      result = iter->second;
    }
    pthread_rwlock_unlock(&rwlock); // unlock read/write lock
    return result;
  }
  catch( ... ) {
    pthread_rwlock_unlock(&rwlock); // unlock read/write lock
    throw;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

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