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Consider this code -

(defn make-getter
  [pred]
  (defn getter
    [db-name htree-name]
    (filter pred (HTreeMap. db-name htree-name))))

(def meta-data-key? #(= (.getKey %) "META_DATA"))
(def not-meta-data-key? #(not (= (.getKey %) "META_DATA")))

(def get-type (make-getter meta-data-key?))
(def get-records (make-getter not-meta-data-key?))

HTreeMap is a java class implementing the Map interface on top of a JDBM HTree. There are two kinds of records in the map - those whose key is "META_DATA" and the rest. What the get-type function should return is only the entry with "META_DATA" key and get-records should return everything except the entry with the "META_DATA" key. But if get-type is now called it returns even those records whose getKey() != "META_DATA". If I change the order of get-type and get-records to

(def get-records (make-getter not-meta-data-key?))
(def get-type (make-getter meta-data-key?))

then both functions return only those records whose getKey() == "META_DATA". Why is the definition of an already defined function overwritten by the one defined later?

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You have only the one instance of getter function at time. You should use anonymous function definition instead of defn getter. –  hsestupin Mar 8 '13 at 8:37
1  
FYI: (def not-meta-data-key? (complement meta-data-key?)) –  A. Webb Mar 8 '13 at 12:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From Clojure docs:

Creates and interns or locates a global var with the name of symbol and a namespace of the value of the current namespace (ns).

So every time you call make-getter, new global function is defined. Of course, there may be only one global function with such name in current namespace, so all previous bindings are overwritten.

What you actually want is returning anonymous closure instead of defining function:

(defn make-getter
  [pred]
  (fn
    [db-name htree-name]
    (filter pred (HTreeMap. db-name htree-name))))

This way get-records and get-types will be initialized with 2 different closure objects (same anonymous function, but with different bound predicates).

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This is more an addition to @ffriend's answer, which is correct. I just think, that it needs a few clarifications, which wasn't quite suitable for a comment.

(defn f [x] body...) is roughly equivalent to (def f (fn [x] body...)). That is, creating a function and assigning it as the value of f. The main problem with your code lies in the fact that defn (like def) returns the symbol, rather than its value. That is:

user=> (defn getter
           [db-name htree-name]
           (filter pred (HTreeMap. db-name htree-name)))
; => #'user/getter

(you'll have the current namespace instead of user)

And so, your consequent definitions of get-type and get-records makes their values the symbol #'user/getter:

user=> getter
; => #<user$getter user$getter@f491ac9>
user=> get-type
; => #'user/getter
user=> get-records
; => #'user/getter

They'll effectively act as aliases to the getter function.

Add to that the fact, that you redefine getter's value with each call to make-getter and you see why you always get the latest definition.

The correct way to fix this is, to define make-getter using fn instead of defn:

(defn make-getter
  [pred]
  (fn
    [db-name htree-name]
    (filter pred (HTreeMap. db-name htree-name))))

Or you can go on and create a macro defgetter like this (not well tested):

(defmacro def-getter
  [name pred]
  `(def ~name (make-getter [~pred])))

And use it like this:

#user=> (def-getter get-type meta-data-key?)
; => #'user/get-type
#user=> (def-getter get-records not-meta-data-key?)
; => #'user/get-records
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