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var multiples = from i in Enumerable.Range(min, (max - min))
                        from r in roots
                        where i % r == 0
                        select i;

For example, if roots = {2,10} it would select 20 twice.

Is it possible to avoid duplicates here?

share|improve this question
    
If you use multiples.Distinct() afterwards, that won't contain duplicates. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Mar 8 '13 at 6:52
up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use Any() instead of a full Cartesian join:

var multiples = from i in Enumerable.Range(min, (max - min))
                where roots.Any(r => i % r == 0)
                select i;

This has the added advantage that it will stop testing elements in roots as soon as it finds one that succeeds, and it does not require a second pass through to pull out the distinct elements.

share|improve this answer
1  
Surely this is smarter than .Distinct() in this case. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Mar 8 '13 at 7:00
    
that is exactly what i'm looking for! very cool! – user1376243 Mar 8 '13 at 7:02
    
@JeppeStigNielsen Oh yeah. A good one. This is what happens when one takes time to really think about what is being done in the question. – Andrew Savinykh Mar 8 '13 at 7:08

Use the Distinct

var multiples = (from i in Enumerable.Range(min, (max - min))
                 from r in roots
                 where i % r == 0
                 select i).Distinct();

This works well on simple types like string and int. not very well on anonymous types.

In your case the i is an int, and it should therefore be ably to sort out dublicates.

EDIT

It does infact works on anonymous types (see Jeppe's comment). because as @Jeppe said the anonymous types have a "good" Equals enabeling the Distict to determin if the to objects are equal / dublicates.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your answer! – user1376243 Mar 8 '13 at 7:00
1  
@user1376243 please accept the answer by clicking the tick if it resolves your query. – Andrew Savinykh Mar 8 '13 at 7:05
5  
You: not very well on anonymous types It (.Distinct()) works great on anonymous types provided that the type of each property of the anonumous type is a type with "good" Equals and GetHashCode implementations. The anonymous type will have (automatically) Equals and GetHashCode which implement "coordinate-wise" equality comparison. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Mar 8 '13 at 7:15
    
@JeppeStigNielsen I didn't think the anonymous types where that smart. But it makes sence that they should be able to do a "good" equals. Thanks for the heads up. edit pending. – Jens Kloster Mar 8 '13 at 7:20

Use DISTINCT

var multiples = (from i in Enumerable.Range(min, (max - min))
                        from r in roots
                        where i % r == 0
                        select i).Distinct();
share|improve this answer

Please use Distinct() Method

var multiples = (from i in Enumerable.Range(min, (max - min))
                 from r in roots
                 where i % r == 0
                 select i).Distinct();
share|improve this answer

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