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I have following code:

using (var session = SessionFactory.OpenSession())
{
  var entity = session.Get<Entity>(id);
  entity.Property1 = "new value";
  using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction())
  {
    entity.Property2 = "new value";
    tx.Commit();
  }
}

And now, I am confused, when tx.Commit(), what will be committed to database? Is only the Property2 (in transaction scope part) will be committed, or both Property1 and Property2 will be committed ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Any changes you make to a persistent object will be sent to the database when the session is flushed, and committing a transaction will flush the session. Note that the session may be flushed automatically in some cases, such as when working with database generated identifiers or when issuing a query.

It is confusing that in NHibernate you can have transaction blocks that contain just a commit. For readability, I would rewrite this as:

using (var session = SessionFactory.OpenSession())
{
  using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction())
  {
      var entity = session.Get<Entity>(id);
      entity.Property1 = "new value";
      entity.Property2 = "new value";
      tx.Commit();
  }
}
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Thanks your patiently answer, I still have a problem. What is the difference between ISession.Flush() and ITransaction.Commit() ? Both of them can synchronize the data to database, but using the ITransaction have to begin it before commiting, and the ISession.BeginTransaction() is a confusing operation, because every changes of session will be committed but not the changes in the transaction scope (from BeginTransaction() to Commit()). –  JasonMing Mar 9 '13 at 5:39
2  
It's explained well in the documentation: nhforge.org/doc/nh/en/index.html#manipulatingdata. My recommendation is to set the session's FlushMode to Commit and use transactions. –  Jamie Ide Mar 9 '13 at 17:59

All properties from entity will be committed. In your configuration you can set a setting that outputs the sql to the console, you can see what queries it sends on every commit.

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Oooo, so, it is commit the changes from the session open not the trasaction begin ? –  JasonMing Mar 8 '13 at 7:34

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