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I'm new to world of rendering and especially to world of 3D rendering.

  • So I want to know what are most popular (open-source) rendering libraries (desirable in Java) or command line utilities (only for Linux)?
  • And what are the most popular formats of input files processed by 3D rendering programs (I heard only about .rib format)?

May be it will be easy to suggest me anything if know what is my goal: my goal is to write some experimental program that can distribute computation-expensive 3D rendering over several nodes in cluster (using Apache Hadoop).

Thanks.

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Try Java3d, JOGL, JMonkey SDK. –  Extreme Coders Mar 8 '13 at 7:05
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SO is not a 'popularity contest', nor are posts that mention 'best' or 'popular' especially welcome. –  Andrew Thompson Mar 8 '13 at 7:50
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@AndrewThompson . I don't agree. I'm not used best word. But in word popular I don't see anything harm. It's easy to say that Java is more popular then Fortran programming language. Or Windows and *nix are most popular operating systems. It is undeniable. So from this point of view it makes sense to ask what are most popular Rendering engines and what are most popular 3D file formats. –  MyTitle Mar 8 '13 at 8:16
    
I agree with @AndrewThompson. However it would be beneficial to instead of best, describe what your data is like. So do you need raytracing? Do you need micropolygon dicing, is a pure rasterizer enough. The thing is ALL even remotely capable renders I'm aware of fit the bill. As all renderers are trivially parallelized on account pixels being independent (so you can tile them). However not all methods are possible to parallelize. A lot of code has been changed to monte-carlo simulation because of this. Also note 3D rendering is a o^3 problem or worse so even a big cluster loses to better code. –  joojaa Mar 11 '13 at 7:57

1 Answer 1

A raytracer would be a computationally expensive option to run. Consider Sunflow, which is available open source under the MIT license.

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