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Title sums it up.

$ echo `seq 0 10` `seq 5 15` | sort -n
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Why doesn't this work?

Even if I don't use seq:

echo '0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15' | sort -n
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

And even ditching echo directly:

$ echo '0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15' > numbers
$ sort -n numbers 
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

sort(1) sorts lines. You have to parse whitespace delimited data yourself:

echo `seq 0 10` `seq 5 15` | tr " " "\n" | sort -n
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Note that I can't test this with seq(1) (not installed on OS X), but this works for echo(1) for me just fine. –  Chris Lutz Oct 7 '09 at 0:26
    
Duh... Thanks. 15 chars –  LiraNuna Oct 7 '09 at 0:27
    
You're welcome. –  Chris Lutz Oct 7 '09 at 0:30

Because you need newlines for sort:

$ echo `seq 0 10` `seq 5 15` | tr " " "\\n" | sort -n | tr "\\n" " "; echo ""
0 1 2 3 4 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 8 9 9 10 10 11 12 13 14 15
$
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You have single line of input. There is nothing to sort.

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3  
Well, technically, there is something to sort, but it's simple and blindingly fast :-) –  paxdiablo Oct 7 '09 at 0:51

The command as you typed it results in the sequence of numbers being all passed to sort in one line. That's not what you want. Just pass the output of seq directly to sort:

(seq 0 10; seq 5 15) | sort -n

By the way, as you just found out, the construct

echo `command`

doesn't usually do what you expect and is redundant for what you actually expect: It tells the shell to capture the output of command and pass it to echo, which produces it as output again. Just let the output of the command go through directly (unless you really mean to have it processed by echo, maybe to expand escape sequences, or to collapse everything to one line).

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'doesn't do what you expect' - Actually it did exactly what I expected it to do. I just didn't remember sort to sort lines :D –  LiraNuna Oct 7 '09 at 10:57
    
I was referring to the general use of the construct. You usually don't expect to collapse all text into one line, for example, or the output of the command to have special characters interpreted (think of security issues, for example). Edited to add "usually", though. –  Idelic Oct 7 '09 at 14:12

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