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I have a pre-existing public/private key pair for RSA encryption which I need to use in .net . All the examples I can find online demonstrate how to generate a new private/public pair and then encrypt/decrypt. ie. something like this:

const int PROVIDER_RSA_FULL = 1;
const string CONTAINER_NAME = "SpiderContainer";
CspParameters cspParams;
cspParams = new CspParameters(PROVIDER_RSA_FULL);
cspParams.KeyContainerName = CONTAINER_NAME;
cspParams.Flags = CspProviderFlags.UseMachineKeyStore;
cspParams.ProviderName = "Microsoft Strong Cryptographic Provider";
rsa = new RSACryptoServiceProvider(cspParams);
.....
rsa.encrypt(...)
rsa.decrypt(...)

As can be seen, there is no avenue for specifying a pre-existing public/private key.

Would anyone know how to accomplish what I am trying to do? Any help would be much appreciated.

Cheers Naren

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What protocol was used to save the key? Is it in a certificate? –  James Black Oct 7 '09 at 1:50
    
I just have a string for the private key, string for a public key and an exponent. –  Naren Oct 7 '09 at 2:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To use an existing key, you can use the ImportParameters-method:

RSAParameters parameters = new RSAParameters()
parameters.Modulus = // ...
parameters.Exponent = // ...
RSA rsa = new RSACryptoServiceProvider();
rsa.ImportParameters(parameters);
rsa.Encrypt(/*...*/);

You can add the private parameters, too, in order to use it for decrypting or signing.

In order to tell you how to get from your existing keydata to the parameters, we need to know exactly how they are encoded. Try showing us the strings (replace most of the private key with Xs if it is a real key).

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Thanks for that. Cleared it up. The key was a string representation of hex. –  Naren Oct 28 '09 at 0:25

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