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I have String[] array like

{"3","2","4","10","11","6","5","8","9","7"}

I woult to sort it in numerical order, not alphabetically order.

If I use

Arrays.sort(myarray);

I obtain

{"10","11","2","3","4","5","6","7","8","9"}

instead of

{"2","3","4","5","6","7","8","9","10","11"}
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3  
If you have strings you want to use as numbers, why don't you convert them to an appropriate, numeric type? Then when you're done with using them as numbers, you can always convert them back to strings again... If you want to go the harder route: create a custom Comparator<String> for the purpose... –  ppeterka Mar 8 '13 at 8:43
    
Cant you loop through the array and convert them into ints –  altsyset Mar 8 '13 at 8:44
    
I read about Comparators, but what is the most efficient way? Compator or simple converting? –  Cricket Mar 8 '13 at 8:52
    
Read my comment below: it will always be more efficient to convert the whole array first because all sorting algorithms take more comparisons than the size of the list. –  jazzbassrob Mar 8 '13 at 8:53
    
If you are using String array to sort by Arrays.sort() then there is no way left for you to sort them as number.Because you can not even change equals method and anyway after all number array is the best choice. –  Pranav Kevadiya Mar 8 '13 at 8:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think by far the easiest and most efficient way it to convert the Strings to ints:

int[] myIntArray = new int[myarray.length];

for (int i = 0; i < myarray.length; i++) {
    myIntArray[i] = Integer.parseInt(myarray[i]);
}

And then sort the integer array. If you really need to, you can always convert back afterwards:

for (int i = 0; i < myIntArray.length; i++) {
    myarray[i] = "" + myIntArray[i];
}

An alternative method would be to use the Comparator interface to dictate exactly how elements are compared, but that would probably amount to converting each String value to an int anyway - making the above approach much more efficient.

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1  
Just a suggestion: perhaps Integer.toString(myIntArray[i]) would illustrate the type conversion more explicitly than "" + myIntArray[i] –  vikingsteve Mar 8 '13 at 9:48

Try a custom Comparator, like this:

    Arrays.sort(myarray, new Comparator<String>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
            return Integer.valueOf(o1).compareTo(Integer.valueOf(o2));
        }
    });

Hope you like it!

share|improve this answer
    
I like the succinctness of this solution, but there is a bit of a performance hit compared to pre-converting the array because we convert a String to an int every time we compare: since the number of comparisons is always greater than the size of the list, we are doing more conversions than necessary. I don't know if performance is an issue for OP but worth bearing in mind. –  jazzbassrob Mar 8 '13 at 8:52
    
True, though I would often use a quick and elegant solution over a more thoroughly performance-tuned one until I know there is a need for the latter. –  vikingsteve Mar 8 '13 at 9:06

U can use sol-1 if it contains only numbers in string format.

Solution-1: -

String []arr = {"3","2","4","10","11","6","5","8","9","7"};
        Set<Integer> set = new TreeSet<Integer>();
        Arrays.sort(arr);
        for(String s:arr){
            System.out.print(s+"  ");
            set.add(Integer.parseInt(s));
        }
        System.out.println(set);
        Integer i = new Integer("4f");
        System.out.println(i);

Solution-2:-

String []arr = {"3","2","4","10","11","6","5","8","9","7","jgj","ek"};
        Set<Integer> intSet = new TreeSet<Integer>();
        Set<String> strSet = new TreeSet<String>();
        Arrays.sort(arr);
        for(String s:arr){
            try {
                int i = Integer.parseInt(s);
                intSet.add(i);
            } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
                strSet.add(s);
            }
        }
        List<String> result = new ArrayList<String>();
        for(int val:intSet){
            result.add(val+"");
        }
        result.addAll(strSet);
        System.out.println(result);
    }

Solution-3:-

Write one CustomComparator class and pass it to the sort() method.

public class CustomComparator implements Comparator<String>{

    @Override
    public int compare(String s1, String s2) {
        Integer i1=null;
        Integer i2=null;
        try {
            i1 = Integer.parseInt(s1);
        } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
        }

        try {
            i2 = Integer.parseInt(s2);
        } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
        }

        if(i1!=null && i2!=null){
            return i1.compareTo(i2);
        }else{
            return s1.compareTo(s2);
        }
    }

}


public static void main(){
String []arr = {"3","2","4","10","11","6","5","8","9","7","jgj","ek"};
Arrays.sort(arr, new CustomComparator());
        for(String s:arr){
            System.out.print(s+"  ");
        }
}
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Your desired output contains the numerical order of corresponding integers of your strings. So simply you cannot avoid conversion of strings to integers. As an alternative comparator to vikingsteve's you can use this:

Arrays.sort(array, new Comparator<String>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(String str1, String str2) {
        return Integer.parseInt(str1) - Integer.parseInt(str2);
    }
});
share|improve this answer

public class test1 {

public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    String[] str = {"3","2","4","10","11","6","5","8","9","7"};
    int[] a = new int[str.length];
    for(int i=0;i<a.length;i++)
    {
        a[i]=Integer.parseInt(str[i]);
    }
    Arrays.sort(a);
    for(int i=0;i<a.length;i++)
    {
        str[i]=String.valueOf(a[i]);
    }
}

}

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