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Why would you use if-else statements if you can make another if statement?

Example with multiple ifs:

input = getInputFromUser()
if input is "Hello"
    greet()

if input is "Bye"
    sayGoodbye()

if input is "Hey"
    sayHi()

Example with else-if:

input = getInputFromUser()
if input is "Hello"
    greet()

else if input is "Bye"
    sayGoodbye()

else if input is "Hey"
    sayHi()
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closed as not constructive by George Stocker Aug 23 '12 at 12:11

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

23  
I'm sick of using words when programming, too. That's why I always program in Whitespace. compsoc.dur.ac.uk/whitespace –  Mark Rushakoff Oct 7 '09 at 1:37
14  
I was under the impression that programming-related questions were allowed here, regardless of the level they were at. This may seem like a basic question to many of us but I fail to see why it's considered "not a real question". –  paxdiablo Oct 7 '09 at 1:50
4  
@Pax hacklord. Need I say more? –  Sinan Ünür Oct 7 '09 at 2:05
4  
I think he means if(...) ...; else if(...) ...; vs if(...) ...; if(...) ...; whereas the latter is "less words". –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 7 '09 at 2:11
3  
I'm voting for reopening. This is a valid question and it's not that badly worded. –  avakar Oct 7 '09 at 7:57
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5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Argh, you need to take cs 101 immediately! learn about branching here

And here is the free online video course from Standford: Introduction to Computer Science

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Branching link is dead. Here's a link to the wikipedia article: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branch_(computer_science) –  Paul Richter Sep 16 '13 at 15:15
    
While helpful, this doesn't answer his question. Consider including the linked text. –  TankorSmash Jul 4 at 2:54
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If you have non-exclusive conditions:

if(a < 100)
{...}
else if (a < 200)
{...}
else if (a < 300)
....

this is very different from the same code without the "else"s...

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It's also more performant.

In your first example, every if will be checked, even if input is "Hello". So you have all three checks.

In your second example, execution will stop once it found a branch, so if the user types "Hello" it will be only one check instead of three.

The difference may not be much in your simple example, but imagine that you're executing a potentially expensive function and you might see the difference.

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you mean like this:

if (a == true && b == false && c == 1 && d == 0) {
    // run if true
}

if (a == false || b == true || c != 1 || d != 0) {
    // else
}

An else-statement would be much clearer and easier to maintain.

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1  
And less error-prone. Your two statements aren't perfect opposites - you need to change && to || in the second one. –  Chris Lutz Oct 7 '09 at 1:32
5  
Finally, you ask the processor to do the same work twice. –  Tom Leys Oct 7 '09 at 1:35
    
@Chris Lutz, found the mistake and fixed it around the same time as you :-) –  Brad Cupit Oct 7 '09 at 1:42
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If you need to chose exactly one action from given set of actions, depending on some conditions, the natural and most clear choice is either switch (don't forget to break after each branch) or combination of if and else. When I write

if (conditon1)
{
    action1();
}
else if (condition2) 
{
    action2();
}
else if (conditon3)
{
    action3();
}
.
.
.
else {
    action_n();
}

it is clear to the reader that exactly one of actions is to be performed. And there is no possibility that because of mistake in conditions more than one action is performed.

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